Resources

This page contains some key resources on walking and cycling, including an archive of the documents produced by the Australian Bicycle Council.

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Date Added
Safe Active Streets Pilot Program
Department of Transport WA

Department of Transport WA has been working with Western Australian local governments to develop, trial and evaluate ‘safe active streets’ which use local area traffic management treatments to encourage more people to walk, wheel and ride in their communities.

18/03/2024 View
Gender Sensitive Urban Design Implementation Toolkit
ACT Government

The Gender Sensitive Urban Design (GSUD) Toolkit is a comprehensive resource designed to provide designers with essential principles, practices, and strategies for creating inclusive public spaces. With a particular focus on the needs of women, girls, gender diverse individuals, and other vulnerable people, the toolkit offers a range of strategies to address the multifaceted aspects of gender sensitivity in the public realm.


These strategies encompass various themes, including the enhancement of perceived safety and the promotion of inclusiveness, ensuring that public spaces are welcoming and accessible for all individuals. By utilising the resources and guidance provided in the GSUD Toolkit, designers can actively contribute to the creation of more equitable and
inclusive urban environments.

01/03/2024 View
Active Travel Plan and Design Guide
ACT Government

This Plan outlines ACT Government priorities for strengthening active travel and improving quality of life. Projects included throughout demonstrate what these priorities mean in practice.

01/03/2024 View
Evaluation and implementation of Shared Spaces in NSW
Transport for NSW

Foundational research designed to support shared space design concepts and applications in NSW, delivered by Transport for NSW in partnership with the University of Technology Sydney.

16/02/2024 View
Planning and designing for active transport
Department of Transport Western Australia

Collaborating with and guiding state and local government and industry partners to plan, design and develop active transport solutions to help make it an easy choice for people of all ages and abilities to walk, wheel and ride.

02/02/2024 View
Northern Territory shared path network reviews
Department of Infrastructure, Planning and Logistics (DIPL), Northern Territory

The Department of Infrastructure, Planning and Logistics (DIPL) has completed a review of Northern Territory Government (NTG) owned shared paths across Greater Darwin, Katherine, Tennant Creek and Alice Springs.

The review is key to continuing strategic development of shared paths in line with stakeholder and community needs for the next 10 years.

The purpose of the review was to assess the existing NTG shared path networks and provide recommendations for:

  • improvements to existing shared paths
  • enhanced connectivity and network extensions between the existing network including between NTG roads and local council roads
  • long term planning, monitoring and review.

A number of key considerations guided the review including efficiency, safety and connectivity.

11/12/2023 View
Australian Transport Assessment and Planning (ATAP) Mode Specific Guidance: M4 Active Travel
Australian Transport Assessment and Planning (ATAP)

At a glance:

  • This document (ATAP Part M4) provides specialist Mode Specific Guidance on active travel. It is supported by a Background Report (M4-BR) in the ATAP Technical Support Library covering detailed and technical material.
  • The defining characteristic of active travel is that it is ‘human powered mobility’. In this guidance, we interpret active travel as comprising primarily walking and cycling, but can also include use of e-bikes, skateboards, roller skates, roller blades and non-electric scooters. While e-scooters and e-skateboards are not ‘human-powered’, they are also considered here because they share some of the facilities provided for active travel, and hence experience associated benefits. The term micro-mobility is increasingly used to refer to all of these modes of transport.
  • Evidence-based assessment of problems and opportunities is the starting point for considering active travel improvements. Problems include: poor weather; lack of infrastructure or appropriate facilities; poor access and connectivity; physical safety concerns; lack of security; inadequate ancillary infrastructure; and poor knowledge and awareness of available facilities and benefits. Opportunities include: reducing health, environmental and road congestion problems by shifting trips from car to active travel; improving accessibility; and reducing inequity for those too young or old to drive, and other people facing transport access difficulties.
  • A wide range of options for addressing a problem or opportunity should be generated and assessed. A full range of options are outlined here. Active travel network design principles are presented: cohesion, directness, safety, comfort, and attractiveness. These assist in the identification of suitable improvement options. A network, and individual improvements, designed with such principles maximises the size of potential mode shifts to active travel.
  • Active travel improvement options are assessed using the same approach used elsewhere in the Guidelines, namely: strategic alignment; and appraisal using cost-benefit analysis of monetised benefits and costs, complemented by non-monetised benefits and costs.
  • Similar to the assessment of other transport modes, benefits consist of:
    • User benefits to active travellers (safety, travel time, private health benefits from physical activity, walking environment amenity benefits)
    • Any resource cost corrections required for unperceived user costs, and
    • External benefits from reductions in external cost to third parties (road decongestion, reduced emissions and improved air pollution, reduced health system costs).
  • The guidance provides explanations of individual benefits, and steps, methodologies and parameter values for their estimation. Appropriate application of the rule-of-a-half to perceived user costs for new active travel trips (diverted from other modes, and newly generated) is also explained.
  • The currently available approaches to active travel demand estimation are summarised: a) simpler estimation approaches (comparison studies, sketch planning, aggregate behaviour studies); b) demand elasticities and diversion rates; c) modelling. Also discussed are: influencing factors, active travel data, tools and other considerations. Active travel demand estimation is a fairly under-developed area, and would benefit significantly from further research and development.
  • Indicative unit costs are provided for various active transport infrastructure elements.
  • Measurement and monitoring of performance of the active travel system is an important final step in the planning and assessment process. It considers whether policies, plans and initiatives are successful in meeting transport system objectives. Performance indicators are required to enable ex-post evaluation and benefit management. The type and timing of monitoring are discussed.
  • The guidance concludes with suggestions of areas requiring further active travel research.
13/11/2023 View
Promotion, encouragement and behaviour change
Department of Transport and Main Roads, Queensland

On this page:

27/10/2023 View
Universal access
Department of Transport and Main Roads, Queensland

On this page:

27/10/2023 View
Speed management and integrated treatments
Department of Transport and Main Roads, Queensland

On this page:

27/10/2023 View
Road crossings
Department of Transport and Main Roads, Queensland

On this page:

27/10/2023 View
Paths for walking
Department of Transport and Main Roads, Queensland

On this page

27/10/2023 View
Construction and maintenance
Department of Transport and Main Roads, Queensland

On this page:

27/10/2023 View
Shade and street trees
Department of Transport and Main Roads, Queensland

On this page:

27/10/2023 View
Pedestrian and Walking Guidance: Supporting facilities
Department of transport and Main Roads, Queensland

On this page:

27/10/2023 View
Urban planning and urban design
Department of Transport and Main Roads, Queensland

On this page:

27/10/2023 View
Walking data
Department of Transport and Main Roads, Queensland

On this page:

13/10/2023 View
Pedestrian and Walking Guidance and Resources
Department of Transport and Main Roads, Queensland

Including:

13/10/2023 View
Walking Network Planning Guidance
Department of Transport and Main Roads, Queensland

More people will walk when everyday destinations are connected by comfortable, direct, safe and accessible routes. Walking network plans (WNPs) are a first step to creating better places to walk.

The Queensland Government is committed to achieving the Queensland Walking Strategy 2019–2029 vision of walking becoming 'an easy choice for everyone, every day'. When we talk about walking, we also include running and moving with the help of a mobility device (such as a wheelchair, mobility cane or a walking frame).

The following guidance supports practitioners to prepare WNPs and a prioritised works program to make the plan a reality.

13/10/2023 View
Disability Standards for Accessible Public Transport 2002 (Transport Standards)
Department of Infrastructure, Transport, Regional Development, Communications and the Arts

The Disability Discrimination Act 1992(the Act) is in place to eliminate discrimination against people with disability as far as possible, and to promote community acceptance of the principle that people with disability have the same fundamental rights as all members of the community. The Act provides that direct and indirect discrimination on the basis of disability is unlawful in a broad range of areas of public life, including and access to goods, services and facilities.

The Disability Standards for Accessible Public Transport 2002 (Transport Standards) provide requirements for public transport operators and providers to make their services accessible and remove discrimination against people with disability. The Transport Standards took effect on 23 October 2002.

The Transport Standards apply to train, tram, bus and coach, ferry, taxi and aviation services and are designed to provide certainty to providers and operators of public transport services and infrastructure about their responsibilities under the Disability Discrimination Act 1992.

13/10/2023 View
Queensland Cycling Action Plan 2023-2025
Department of Transport and Main Roads, Queensland

The Queensland Cycling Action Plan 2023-2025 lists the practical actions the Queensland Government needs to do right now to grow cycling, to be updated every 2 years.

This is the third action plan under the Queensland Cycling Strategy, which is helping achieve the Queensland Government's objectives for the community. The Queensland Cycling Action Plan 2020-2022 and Queensland Cycling Action Plan 2017-2019 are also available.

The Queensland Cycling Strategy 2017-2027 and Queensland State of Cycling Report 2022 are also available.

06/10/2023 View
Queensland State of Cycling Report 2022
Department of Transport and Main Roads, Queensland

The Queensland State of Cycling Report 2022 tracks the Queensland Government’s progress towards achieving the vision of ‘more cycling, more often’, to be updated every 2 years.

This is the third report under the Queensland Cycling Strategy, which is helping achieve the Queensland Government's objectives for the community. The Queensland State of Cycling Report 2019 and Queensland State of Cycling Report 2017 are also available.

The Queensland Cycling Strategy 2017-2027 and Queensland Cycling Action Plan are also available.

06/10/2023 View
National Walking and Cycling Participation Survey 2023
CWANZ

The National Walking and Cycling Participation Survey (NWCPS) provides insight into walking and cycling activity across Australia and is a successor to the National Cycling Participation Survey which was conducted biennially from 2011 to 2019.

22/09/2023 View
Speed zones
Transport for NSW

Speed limits are set to allow you to safely respond to potential risks on the road. Lower speed limits apply in areas where there are more people and vehicles. This is to reduce the chance of crashes and serious injuries. Includes:

  • Speed zones and signs
  • How speed zones are set and reviewed
  • Latest changes to permanent speed limits
  • NSW Speed Zoning Standard

22/09/2023 View
Active Travel to Schools Programs
CWANZ

An overview of active travel to schools programs across Australia and New Zealand, their key features and what makes them successful. Also includes a comparison of the number of children that use active travel to school from around the world.

23/08/2023 View
Pedestrian Demand Forecasting Tool
Department of Transport and Main Roads, Queensland

This tool provides an implementation of the three pedestrian forecasting procedures described in the TMR Pedestrian demand forecasting guideline.

The guidance describes three forecasting procedures:

  • Comparison method: use counts for other comparable sites to estimate demand at the project site. This method is implemented here on the Database tab where a larger number of pedestrian counts in Queensland can be filtered based on location and facility type.
  • Factoring: apply an uplift factor to pre-construction counts obtained at or near the project site to account for likely additional walking activity that will be attracted from other routes, other modes or are all-new (induced) trips. This procedure is implemented on the Factoring tab.
  • Direct demand: regression model based on the pedestrian counts database linking pedestrian demand to land use (e.g. population, employment, schools) and network (e.g. signalised intersection, shared path) attributes. This procedure is implemented on the Direct demand tab.
17/07/2023 View
Pedestrian Demand Forecasting Guideline
Department of Transport and Main Roads, Queensland

The intent of this document is to provide guidance to practitioners to forecast demand for pedestrians
for new infrastructure such as:

  • footpaths or shared paths, including 'missing links' in an existing path network
  • unsignalised road crossings such as pedestrian refuges, zebra or wombat crossings or grade separated infrastructure, and/or
  • signalised road crossings, including mid-block pedestrian operated signals and pedestrian crossings at signalised intersections. This guidance does not consider pedestrian simulation modelling; that is, the modelling of crowd dynamics for purposes such as typical and emergency egress from train stations or sports stadiums.
17/07/2023 View
Planning for walking
Department of Transport and Main Roads, Queensland

Including:

17/07/2023 View
Movement Strategy
City of Darwin

The Movement Strategy aims to make it easier for all people to move around our suburbs and city by improving streetscapes, infrastructure and connectivity while reducing the impact of transport on the environment. The Movement Strategy creates a framework and direction to align investment and policy decisions with the aspirations of the community. 

02/06/2023 View
Getting to and from public transport
Waka Kotahi NZ Transport Agency

Getting to and from public transport is integral to every public transport journey. 

All passengers must make their way to a public transport stop to board public transport, then make their way from where they disembark to their final destination. Often referred to as the ‘first and last mile’, the actual length of these trips can range from less than 100m to many kilometres. 

First and last mile connections are critical to a viable and enjoyable public transport journey experience.

Key issues relating to the quality and ease of access to and from a public transport stop include:

  • The distance between the origin/ destination and the public transport station or stop. This largely determines whether passengers choose to walk or cycle, or use a car, motorbike, or bus to access public transport.
  • The level of comfort and universal access along the connecting route. Even short distances can be perceived as unattractive or inaccessible if they involve long or convoluted road crossings, extensive exposure to inclement weather or lack of appropriate infrastructure.
  • The availability and attractiveness of options including taxi/ rideshare or feeder bus services, as well as facilities for Kiss and Ride or Park and Ride.
  • A person’s level of perceived or actual safety and security accessing public transport. 

It is important that those involved in public transport planning consider the whole of the passengers' journey. When planning for public transport journeys, the following questions should be considered:

  • How will people get to and from their public transport services?
  • Is the whole journey accessible for all people?
  • Is the whole journey safe?
  • Is the whole journey attractive, convenient, relatively seamless, and intuitive?
  • Is the whole journey affordable?
19/05/2023 View
Research Report 512 The New Zealand accessibility analysis methodology
Waka Kotahi NZ Transport Agency

This research considers land use and transport accessibility drawing on international practice from the UK, Europe, USA and Australia. An objective of the research was to define accessibility and propose a methodology for how accessibility could be measured and quantified in New Zealand, both at a neighbourhood or a wider area such as a suburb, city or region.

The result of the research was an understanding of other countries’ experiences developing and setting accessibility policy and the success of those approaches. This is important because if New Zealand chooses to set explicit accessibility policy, the research explains how that might be best achieved.

A second result of the research was the development of a new methodology for calculating accessibility that draws on overseas and improved practice. The new methodology quantitatively measures accessibility taking into consideration different modes of travel (walk, cycle, private motor vehicle etc), travel behaviour (ideally using logistic decay functions), destinations (origin or destination based), activities (consumed or supplied) and multiple opportunities (saturations). The calculation methodology was piloted on Christchurch (a city of some 350,000 people) and the accessibility of every household quantified to a variety of destinations including doctors, supermarkets and schools.

Keywords: accessibility, cycling, GIS, indicators, journey planning, methodology, modelling, networks, New Zealand, public transport, transport, walking

19/05/2023 View
Research Report 363 Accessibility planning methods
Waka Kotahi NZ Transport Agency

This research investigated the applicability of accessibility planning in New Zealand as a tool for assessing and improving personal access to essential services for all New Zealanders.

It canvassed international accessibility planning practices in England, the Netherlands and Southern California to understand the various drivers for its introduction and the different approaches taken in its implementation.

All three case studies share the goal of improving individuals’ access to activity centres and recognise that accessibility planning is best undertaken at the local level with some form of central government guidance and monitoring.

The English comprehensive accessibility planning framework has been adapted to New Zealand’s existing social services and local government legislative and institutional environment and the recently legislated changes to the government land transport sector.

The resulting recommended framework employed a collaborative approach to assess and improve people’s accessibility to employment, food shopping, health, education and social services across New Zealand.

All levels of government would participate in the assessment of accessibility, development of priorities, indicators and action plans and monitor progress against outcomes, within government frameworks.

Transport actions developed by regional accessibility partnerships to address regional problems would feed directly into their regional land transport programmes for prioritisation for funding.

19/05/2023 View
Accessibility
Waka Kotahi NZ Transport Agency

Key design parameters for accessibility such as kerb arrangements, access ramps, tactile ground surface indicators, and pedestrian movement.

19/05/2023 View
Disability Access and Inclusion Plan 2020-2022
Department for Infrastructure and Transport, South Australia

The Disability Access and Inclusion Plan details the Department for Infrastructure and Transport’s commitment to promoting, protecting and enhancing the rights of people living with disability in South Australia. The Plan includes clear and measurable actions and targets designed through community and Departmental consultation to give effect to the priority areas of the first State Disability Inclusion Plan 2019-2023, as they relate to the purpose and activities of the Department.

19/05/2023 View
Disability Inclusion Action Plan 2018 – 2022
Transport for NSW

The NSW Government is funding numerous projects under the Transport Access Program to upgrade train stations, ferry wharves and interchanges. New infrastructure, such as the Sydney Metro Northwest and the CBD and South East Light Rail, are being built to the very highest standards of accessibility.

We have invested in new trains, buses and ferries – all which have improved accessibility features.

The Disability Inclusion Action Plan 2018-2022 builds upon the successes of the previous plan, the Disability Action Plan 2012-2017, to set an ambitious agenda for the next five years.

This document presents a vision of a more accessible future for transport in NSW. More importantly, it outlines concrete, measurable steps towards achieving that vision.

19/05/2023 View
Disability Access and Inclusion Plan
Department of Transport, Main Roads Western Australia and Public Transport Authority

The PTA, together with our Transport Portfolio partners Main Roads and the Department of Transport, has developed the Transport Portfolio Disability Access and Inclusion Plan (DAIP) for 2022-2027.

The DAIP aims to ensure that people with a disability have the same opportunity as other people to access PTA public transport services, information and facilities.

The PTA has also developed the PTA Implementation Plan for Transport Portfolio Disability Access and Inclusion Plan which demonstrates our commitment to providing a high level of independence for all passengers.

19/05/2023 View
Accessibility Policy
Public Transport Authority Western Australia

The PTA Accessibility Policy has been developed as the overarching document for access.  Our Accessibility Policy outlines how the PTA shall, as far as reasonably practical, provide public passenger transport services and facilities that are accessible to all passengers.

19/05/2023 View
Transport Accessibility Strategy
Department of Transport and Planning

The Victorian Government is working to ensure our public transport network is inclusive and accessible for all Victorians.

In Victoria, 1.1 million people have either a physical or non-physical disability. Our ageing population and those with other mobility barriers also need accessibility support on the transport network.  

We’re developing a Transport Accessibility Strategy to improve accessibility for everyone across the transport network. 

In developing the strategy, we’ve taken a user-centred approach, drawing on the experiences and views of a wide range of people with disability from across Victoria. 

We’re also taking a whole-of-system view to identify opportunities to improve the experiences of people with disability. 

The Strategy will help us set priorities for addressing issues across all elements of the transport system, including public transport, roads, parking, bike lanes and shared paths. 

The strategy is expected to be completed by 2023.

19/05/2023 View
Accessibility and Inclusion Strategy Summary
Department of Transport and Main Roads Queensland

TMR commits to lead the delivery of accessible and inclusive transport products, services, information and infrastructure, and TMR workplaces and work practices. 

19/05/2023 View
Accessibility and Inclusion Plan 2023–2024
Department of Main Roads and Transport Queensland

The TMR Accessibility and Inclusion Plan 2023–2024 was developed to outline the practical actions TMR will take over the next 2 years to deliver our vision. 

To develop the plan, we looked at best practice research, data and analysis, international accessibility and inclusion reporting frameworks, key indicators of success, and we engaged our customers, partners and staff.

This plan outlines 27 actions across 3 key pillars:

  1. Strategy
  2. Culture
  3. Process

We will report our progress on the plan actions and in 2024 we will develop an updated plan based on key learnings, co-design activities and emerging trends. 

This plan is available in the following accessible formats: 

19/05/2023 View
Accessibility and inclusion strategy
Department of Main Roads and Transport, Queensland

The Accessibility and Inclusion Strategy (AIS) will ensure that TMR's approach to accessibility and inclusion aligns with the Queensland Government's Advancing Queensland's Priorities.

19/05/2023 View
Evaluation of permanent 40km/h speed limits: Summary report
Transport for NSW
17/05/2023 View
40 km/h speed limits in high volume pedestrian areas
Transport for NSW

A guide to identifying and implementing 40 km/h speed limits in high volume pedestrian areas.

15/05/2023 View
Personal mobility device plans
Deaprtment of Transport and Main Roads, Queensland

Personal mobility devices include things like e-scooters, e-skateboards and self-balancing one or two-wheelers.

The recent boom in the use of personal mobility devices has created some safety issues as riders share a range of infrastructure with other road and path users. 

Shared e-scooter and e-bike hire schemes have also become commonplace across Queensland. While these schemes are a great mobility option, they have created some problems with parking on footpaths.

To address safety and parking concerns Deaprtment of Transport and Main Roads, Queensland are delivering:

  • Personal Mobility Device Safety Action Plan
  • e-Mobility Parking Plan
01/05/2023 View
Personal mobility devices
Department of Transport and Main Roads, Queensland

Know your way around Personal Mobility Devices such as e-scooters, e-skateboards and segways.

  • Get the facts
  • Tools & Tips
  • Campaigns
01/05/2023 View
Waka Kotahi Cycling Action Plan
Waka Kotahi NZ Transport Agency

The Waka Kotahi Cycling Action Plan sets out a pathway to significantly increase the safety and attractiveness of cycling and micromobility in towns and cities across Aotearoa New Zealand.

It outlines the strategic priorities for Waka Kotahi, and includes the detailed actions we will take, alongside our partners, to help achieve the substantial shifts required. While it is not a funding plan, it will help inform future transport prioritisation and investment decisions.

01/05/2023 View
Get NSW Active
Transport for NSW

The Get NSW Active program provides local councils with funding for projects that create safe, easy and enjoyable walking and cycling trips. These trips help to relieve pressure on our roads and public transport networks and are part of a healthy lifestyle for NSW communities.

01/05/2023 View
Bike-friendly business
Department of Transport and Main Roads, Queensland

Bike riders are customers who choose to arrive by bike. There’s a big opportunity for businesses to achieve growth by becoming bike-friendly.

More than ever, bike riders want to go from A to Business. There’s growing demand to stop, shop and spend at bike-friendly businesses of all different types, from local cafes right through to tourism destinations.

Being bike-friendly can be a point of difference for a business. It means the business can offer more customers more choice and freedom.

06/04/2023 View
Safe Active Streets Pilot Program Evaluation
Department of Transport WA

The Safe Active Street (SAS) Program’s vision is to create shared street spaces that provide a convenient travel option within a safe and attractive environment for people riding and walking of all ages and abilities.

To achieve the vision of the SAS Program the following objectives have been established:

  • Reduce vehicle numbers and vehicle speeds.
  • Increase the number of people of all ages and abilities making local trips by riding and walking.
  • Increase the number of riding and walking trips throughout the week.
  • Safe Active Street users, residents and the wider community recognise Safe Active Streets as safe and comfortable places to walk and ride.

The SAS Pilot Program is being evaluated in line with DoT’s SAS Pilot Program Evaluation Plan, which has adopted a summative evaluation framework that considers impacts, cost effectiveness and comparability between projects. The SAS Pilot Program Evaluation Plan clearly details in an Outcomes Measurement Framework the specific indicators, targets, and data sources to adequately evaluate the program.

05/04/2023 View
Active Travel to School Roadmap 2023-2030
Department of Transport WA

The Active Travel to School Roadmap aims to reverse the declining rate of walking and cycling to school in Perth.

Containing 24 initiatives, the Roadmap seeks to address key urban planning, policy, individual and social factors, and enable more children to walk, bike ride, scoot and catch public transport to school.

The Roadmap was developed by a dedicated Active Travel to School Working Group, which was established by the Bicycle Riding Reference Group, and has been endorsed by the Departments of Transport, Education and Health, the Road Safety Commission, the Western Australian Local Government Association and the Institute of Public Works and Engineering Australasia.

Delivery of the Roadmap will commence in 2023 and progress will be reported to the Bicycle Riding Reference Group.

21/03/2023 View
Active Travel to School: Ride or Walk to School (Safe Cycle)
Transport Canberra and City Services

PROGRAM FEATURES: 

  • Free access to sets of loan bikes for five weeks
  • Safe Cycle: an Australian Curriculum aligned classroom program for students to learn about bike safety and skills
  • TQI Accredited Professional Learning workshops or online training
  • Resources and support to run four active travel events in your school each year (National Ride2School Day, Walk Safely to School Day, Winter Walk to School Week and Ride Safely to School Week)
  • Personalised maps to show the best route to your school
  • Support from a dedicated program manager.

DATE IMPLEMENTED: 1 December 2012

COST OF PROGRAM: $75,000 per year

COST FOR USERS: Free

ADDITIONAL INFORMATION:

The Ride or Walk to School program (primary) and It's Your Move Safe Cycle program (high school) provides ACT schools with safe cycling resources. It is aligned to the Australian curriculum and includes teacher training and information for parents. The aim is to increase the number of children walking and riding to and from school.

Part of program incorporating infrastructure, signage (Active Streets), and safety at school crossings (School Crossing Supervisors) to encourage children to use active travel to get to and from school.

RESULTS OF EVALUATION:

Report

14/03/2023 View
Active Travel to School Program: School Transport Infrastructure Program
Department of Transport and Main Roads, Queensland

PROGRAM FEATURES: 

Funding to improve the safety and operation of schools through new or improved infrastructure at the school and/or on the surrounding road network. E.g.:

  • construction / upgrading of bikeways and shared pathways
  • construction / upgrading of pedestrian pathways, fencing and barriers
  • Installation / upgrading of pedestrian refuges and crossings
  • Provision / upgrading of bike racks / cages / parking facilities and shelters for public and active transport users
  • installation / upgrading of traffic signals and other intersection improvements
  • Installation / upgrading of other signage, line-marking or pavement marking to improve safety or compliance

DATE IMPLEMENTED: Not available

COST OF PROGRAM: Not available. Grants up to $500,000 available

COST TO USER: Funding usually provided on a 50:50 subsidy basis, e.g. co-funding between Department of Transport and Main Roads and local government

RESULTS OF EVALUATION: Not available

28/02/2023 View
Safer Speeds Case Study - Padbury, Western Australia

STREET NAME: Local residential streets

SUBURB: Padbury

MUNICIPALITY: City of Joondalup

STATE & COUNTRY: Western Australia, Australia

SPEED REDUCTION: From 50 km/h to 30 km/h

DATE IMPLEMENTED: NA

SCHEME INCLUDED: 

  • Trial period
  • Community consultation prior
  • 30 km/h signs
  • self-enforcing speed limit

COST: Not available

ADDITIONAL INFORMATION:

  • Main distributor roads (Giles Avenue, Gibson Avenue, Forrest Road and Alexander Road) stayed at their current speed limits.
  • Main community concern was about impact on travel times. Project demonstrated that impact was minimal, with significant improvements in road safety and pedestrian amenity.

RESULTS OF EVALUATION: Not available

28/02/2023
Active Travel to School Program: Walk to School
City of Whittlesea

PROGRAM FEATURES: 

  • Onine resources

DATE IMPLEMENTED: Not available

COST: Not available

14/02/2023 View
Active Travel to School Program: Stroll & Roll
Latrobe City Council

PROGRAM FEATURES: 

  • Bike education facilitator training
  • TagOn or passports to record how student travelled to school
  • Student incentives
  • Installation of infrastructure such as Park & Walk zones
  • Active travel maps
  • Online resources

DATE IMPLEMENTED: 30 January 2022

COST OF PROGRAM: Not available

COST FOR USERS: None

RESULTS OF EVALUATION: Not available

14/02/2023 View
Active Travel to School Program: Safe Routes to School Program
WestCycle

PROGRAM FEATURES: 

Part of Bike Friendly Schools Program

DATE IMPLEMENTED: Not available

COST: Not available

RESULTS OF EVALUATION: Not available

30/01/2023 View
Active Travel to School Program: Whittlesea Active Travel in Schools
City of Whittlesea

PROGRAM FEATURES: 

  • Active travel study of local schools to determine barriers and enablers
  • Active Travel Forum for council staff
  • Influencing built enviroment to incorporate principles that support walkign and cycling into planning and transport strategies
  • Engage partents to co-creat social marketign campaign
  • Events: local Walk to School competition during Walk to School month
  • Leadership trainng for students
  • Support students to create videos advocating for imporived pedestrian infrastrcuture
  • Link schools to Walk and Ride to School programs
  • Establish School Active Travel Network
  • Resources kit
  • Grants

DATE IMPLEMENTED: 2013

COST: Not available

RESULTS OF EVALUATION: Not available

30/01/2023 View
Active Travel to School Program: Port Sorell Primary School - Active Travel to School
Port Sorell Primary School

PROGRAM FEATURES: 

  • Cycle and Bike-path committee
  • Background research
  • Audits of walking and cycling routes
  • Engineering works wo timporve connectivity and safty of paths and road crossings
  • Signage
  • Extra garbage bins along routes
  • Bike racks installed at school and recreational facilities (for after school activities)
  • Newsletter

DATE IMPLEMENTED: 2013

COST: Not available

RESULTS OF EVALUATION: Not available

30/01/2023 View
Active Travel to School Program: Safe school travel (SafeST) program
Queensland Government

PROGRAM FEATURES: 

DATE IMPLEMENTED: Not available

COST: Not available

RESULTS OF EVALUATION: Not available

30/01/2023 View
Active Travel to School Program: Ipswich Healthy Active School Travel
City of Ipswich

PROGRAM FEATURES: 

  • Active travel social media posts
  • Personalised Active School Travel maps and magnets
  • Hi-Vis vests for walking group leaders

DATE IMPLEMENTED: Not available

COST: Not available

RESULTS OF EVALUATION: Not available

30/01/2023 View
Active Travel to School Program: National Walk Safely to School Day
Pedestrian Council of Australia

PROGRAM FEATURES: 

  • Online resources

DATE IMPLEMENTED: Not available

COST: Not available. Free for schools.

RESULTS OF EVALUATION: Not available

30/01/2023 View
Active Travel to School Program: Active School Travel, Sunshine Coast Council
Sunshine Coast Council

PROGRAM FEATURES: 

DATE IMPLEMENTED: Not available

COST: Not available

RESULTS OF EVALUATION: Not available

30/01/2023 View
Active Travel to School Program: Bike Friendly Schools
WestCycle

PROGRAM FEATURES: 

  • Teacher accreditaion course: cycling
  • Educational resources
  • Teachers network
  • Learn to Ride
  • Bike hire
  • Bike maintenance courses
  • Bike skills sessions
  • Community bike events
  • After school activities
  • Fundraising events
  • Safe Routes to School Program

DATE IMPLEMENTED: Not available

COST: Not available

RESULTS OF EVALUATION: Not available

30/01/2023 View
Active Travel to School Program: Your Move Schools
Department of Transport, WA

PROGRAM FEATURES: 

  • Hands up survey
  • Activities
  • Rewards
  • Support
  • Journey planner
  • Events
  • Online resources
  • Grants

DATE IMPLEMENTED: 2017

COST OF PROGRAM: Not available

COST FOR USERS: None

RESULTS OF EVALUATION: Not available

30/01/2023 View
Active Travel to School Program: Walk to School Month
City of Moonee Valley

PROGRAM FEATURES: 

  • Journey planner showing:
    • Active paths
    • Park and walk paths
    • Dop off/pick up zones
    • Walking School Bus routes
  • Walking School Bus
  • Walk to School Month (November)
  • School crossing supervisors
  • Online resources

DATE IMPLEMENTED: Not available

COST: Not available

RESULTS OF EVALUATION: Not available

30/01/2023 View
Active Travel to School Program: Walk to School (VicHealth)
VicHealth

PROGRAM FEATURES: 

  • Worksheets
  • Online resources
  • Communicatons kit for councils
  • Equirt assessment

DATE IMPLEMENTED: Not available

COST OF PROGRAM: Not available

COST FOR USERS: None

RESULTS OF EVALUATION: Not available

30/01/2023 View
Active Travel to School Program: The Healthy Schools Achievement Program
Cancer Council Victoria

PROGRAM FEATURES: 

  • Online resources
  • Support
  • Recognition
  • Snapshot survey

DATE IMPLEMENTED: Not available

COST: Not available. Free for schools.

RESULTS OF EVALUATION: Not available

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Active Travel to School Program: Move Well, Eat Well (Stride and Ride)
Department of Health, Tasmania

PROGRAM FEATURES: 

Stride and Ride:

  • Free balance bike and helmet sets for early years
  • Action plan
  • Starter pack booklet
  • Annual events
  • Online resources
  • Sample policies

DATE IMPLEMENTED: Not available

COST OF PROGRAM: Not available

COST FOR USERS: None

RESULTS OF EVALUATION: Not available

30/01/2023 View
Active Travel to School Program: Way2Go Bike Ed
Department for Infrastructure and Transport, South Australia

PROGRAM FEATURES: 

  • Bike education program for up to 60 schools annually
  • Educates students on Australian Road rules, and how to safely ride on local roads
  • Bike checks undertaken by qualified technicians
  • Bike Ed program is funded via the over arching Way2Go program

DATE IMPLEMENTED:

  • Bike Education in some form has been supported by DIT since early 2000’s.
  • Way2Go Bike Ed commenced in 2009

COST OF PROGRAM: Not available

COST FOR USERS: Free for schools

RESULTS OF EVALUATION: Report

30/01/2023 View
Active Travel to School Program: Way2Go
Department for Infrastructure and Transport, South Australia

PROGRAM FEATURES: 

  • Infrastructure program in conjunction with Local Government
  • Funding program for school end of trip facilities
  • Supply of school crossing equipment
  • School travel surveys
  • School enrolment mapping
  • Online resources

DATE IMPLEMENTED: Commenced in 2005 as Safe Routes to School, re-branded to Way2Go in 2009

COST OF PROGRAM: Not available

COST FOR USERS: Free for schools

RESULTS OF EVALUATION: Not available

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Active Travel to School Program: Go Noosa Schools
Noosa Council

PROGRAM FEATURES: 

  • Support of a dedicated Noosa Council Project Officer
  • Project sponsor, Working group, school champions (students)
  • Site assessment and baseline survey
  • Travel plan, reviewed annually
  • Events (Ride2School Day, Walk to School Day, Bike week etc.)
  • Surveys
  • Resouces
  • Education
  • Meetings and workshops

DATE IMPLEMENTED: Not available

COST: Not available

RESULTS OF EVALUATION: Not available

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Active Travel to School Program: Active School Travel, City of Gold Coast
City of Gold Coast

PROGRAM FEATURES: 

Schools that join the program receive a suite of resources including free toolkits, incentives and support. Including:

  • Fact sheets
  • Active School Travel Committee

Educational programs:

  • Riding Rulz bike skills
  • Police Citizens Youth Club bike skills
  • BUS IT Bus skills workshop

DATE IMPLEMENTED: Not available

COST: Not available

RESULTS OF EVALUATION: Not available

Case studies

30/01/2023 View
Active Travel to School Program: Active School Travel Program, Brisbane City Council
Brisbane City Council

PROGRAM FEATURES: 

The Active School Travel (AST) program offers Brisbane primary schools a suite of free resources, tools and incentives to enable students, parents, carers and teachers to leave the car at home and actively travel to school.

Participating schools will receive access resources, including:

  • a dedicated Council expert tol work closely with the school’s AST committee and provide specialist advice on the best ways to increase active travel
  • rewards and incentives
  • customised active travel maps with identified active travel routes
  • assembly performances
  • free 60 minute bike and scooter skills training programs with a professional coach
  • RACQ Streets Ahead road safety sessions
  • bus orientation sessions for senior students covering essential skills such as hailing a bus, using a go card and expected behaviour on public transport
  • survey templates and materials for your weekly active travel days
  • tools to showcase the school's achievements
  • interclass and interschool competitions
  • curriculum links for teachers to use in the classroom.

Other resources:

  • Online active travel tips

DATE IMPLEMENTED: 2004

COST OF PROGRAM: FY 2022-23 $699,000

COST FOR USERS: Free for schools.

RESULTS OF EVALUATION:

Testimonials

Case study:

Since 2004, 168 schools and more than 127,000 students have participated in the program.

Achievements in 2021:

  • schools achieved over 60% active travel on a regular basis;
  • 245 kids attended bike skills sessions and 379 attended scooter skills sessions; and
  • 83% of parents felt their child’s road safety knowledge improved since being in the AST program.

Approximately 90% of AST committee members agreed the AST program helped to increase student physical activity levels and foster community cohesion at their school.

30/01/2023 View
Active Travel to School Program: Active School Travel, Bicycle Queensland
Bicycle Queensland

PROGRAM FEATURES: 

Resources for schools:

  • Education & training for children
  • Training for teachers
  • Maps or journey planner
  • Online resources (e.g. fact sheets, information, tips)
  • Grants

Online resouces:

  • How to buy a kid's bike
  • Hand signals
  • Bike check
  • Parking your bike at school
  • Active Travel Checklist
  • Fitting your helmet

DATE IMPLEMENTED: 2021

COST OF PROGRAM: Not available. Funding provided by community road safety program

COST TO USERS: None

RESULTS OF EVALUATION: Not available

17/01/2023 View
Active Travel to School Program: Darwin Safe and Active Routes to School Tool Kit
City of Darwin

PROGRAM FEATURES: 

A toolkit that provides a step by step approach for schools to create a program and activity for schools and families to promote active travel to school. The toolkit is divided into the following categories:

  • Governance
  • Catchment
  • Activities
  • Travel Plan
  • Local Environment

DATE IMPLEMENTED: August 2016

COST OF PROGRAM: Not available

COST TO USER: None

ADDITIONAL INFORMATION: Other resources available are:

  • Templates
  • Surveys
  • Factsheet

RESULTS OF EVALUATION: Not available

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Active Travel to School Program: Switch it Up
NSW Education

PROGRAM FEATURES: 

  • Online resources listing reasons to actively travel to and from school

DATE IMPLEMENTED: Not available

COST: Not available

RESULTS OF EVALUATION: Not available

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Active Travel to School Program: BikeReady (NSW)
NSW Health

PROGRAM FEATURES: Resource to support communities and schools to encourage more young people to walk or cycle, and to involve young people in the development and implementation of an active travel initiative. Includes:

  • Resource for promoting active travel in young people
  • Action Plan template
  • Action Plan example
  • Surveys
  • Facilties review checklist

DATE IMPLEMENTED: Not available

COST: Not available

RESULTS OF EVALUATION: Not available

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Active Travel to School: Bikes in Schools
Waka Kotahi New Zealand Transport Agency

PROGRAM FEATURES: 

A typical Bikes in Schools package includes:

  • fleet of 30-50 new good quality bikes (in different sizes)
  • bike helmet for every child
  • riding, pump and bike skills tracks
  • bike storage where needed
  • cycle skills training

Online resources also available, including bike games.

DATE IMPLEMENTED: Not available

COST: Not available

ADDITIONAL INFORMATION: Part of program that also includes BikeReady

RESULTS OF EVALUATION: Not available

17/01/2023 View
Active Travel to School Program: BikeReady (NZ)
Waka Kotahi New Zealand Transport Agency

PROGRAM FEATURES: 

  • Cycle skills training by experienced instructors
  • Curriculum resources for teachers

DATE IMPLEMENTED: Not available

COST: Not available

ADDITIONAL INFORMATION: Part of program that also includes Bikes in Schools

RESULTS OF EVALUATION: Not available

17/01/2023 View
Active Travel to School Program: Bikes for Schools
AusCycling

PROGRAM FEATURES: 

  • Libraries of donated bikes that are owned by schools and can be used by all students
  • AusCycling Foundation Instructor training to teachers and parents, so bike education can be embedded as part of the day-to-day activities at the school

DATE IMPLEMENTED: Not available

COST: Not available

ADDITIONAL INFORMATION:

Ride Nation funds:

  • The framework and set up for a bike donation day or connection with a partner that will accept and repurpose donated bikes to create the library.
  • Access to the online instructor training course and the conduct of the practical session and assessment onsite at the school at a time convenient to the participants.
  • Lesson plans and resources for the Ride Nation Schools bike education program, which consists of three levels – Skills, Confidence and Explore.
  • Ongoing support for the school to keep providing bike education for all students.

Plus they:

  • Facilitate the connection with community mentors to lead the donation drive and ensure the donated bikes are in good working order.

RESULTS OF EVALUATION: Not available

16/01/2023 View
Active Travel to School Program: Ride Nation Schools
AusCycling

PROGRAM FEATURES: 

Ride Nation Schools is a learn-to-ride Bike Education Program delivered in schools Australia-wide. It is a fun and interactive learning experience that teaches young people to develop their riding skills and confidence – supporting kids in their independence and giving parents peace of mind.

DATE IMPLEMENTED: Not available

COST: Not available

ADDITIONAL INFORMATION:

There are three levels of bike education programs in schools:

Ride Nation - Skills (Playground): Recommended for grades 2-3, this 4–6-week program focuses on developing the essential bike control skills braking, balancing and riding. The skills learnt in this program will allow them to ride around in traffic free environments (school yard, park and around the block).

Ride Nation - Confidence (Pathways): Recommended for grades 3-5. Once grasping the essential bike control skills, participants are ready to develop their riding confidence. This 4-6-week program focuses on riding and situational awareness, providing students with the skills and competences to enable them to start riding on footpaths and shared pathway in low traffic environments. This program is ideal to start having students riding to and from school!

Ride Nation - Explore (Places): Recommended for grades 5-6. Looks at utilising all the skills learnt through previous programs and develop them in different cycling situations and explore their local area by developing road safety and situational awareness. The program consists of four weeks of practical skill development and learning and ends with two local community rides for children to understand what is in their community.

RESULTS OF EVALUATION: Not available

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Active Travel to School Program: RideScore
We Ride Australia

PROGRAM FEATURES: 

RideScore Active Schools uses technology to direct message parents when their children have arrived safely at school.

The program uses:

  • Smart beacons to alert parents automatically when their child arrives at school
  • Advanced use of mapping to identify safe routes to school
  • App-based information and registration technology
  • Bicycle education, and
  • Encouragement awards for students who ride and scoot to school.

DATE IMPLEMENTED: November 219

COST: Not available

ADDITIONAL INFORMATION:

RESULTS OF EVALUATION: In progress

16/01/2023 View
Active Travel to School Program: Open Streets
Bicycle Network

PROGRAM FEATURES: 

  • Open up the streets around schools at drop-off and pick-up times so that children and adults can walk and ride freely, without having to worry about car traffic
  • provides temporary infrastrcuture and signage to manage traffic

DATE IMPLEMENTED: Not available

COST: Not available

ADDITIONAL INFORMATION:

Part of suite of programs to help break down the barriers that prevent more students from staying active on their journey to school. Culminates in National Ride2School Day.

RESULTS OF EVALUATION: Not available

16/01/2023 View
Active Travel to School Program: Ride2School
Bicycle Network

PROGRAM FEATURES: 

  • Bike education
  • Open Streets: open up the streets around schools at drop-off and pick-up times so that children and adults can walk and ride freely, without having to worry about car traffic
  • MIND.BODY.PEDAL: a series of four workshops in one day for secondary schools that aims to inspire more teenage girls to get active through bike riding
  • ActiveSuite: designated routes (ActivePaths) and local maps (ActiveMaps) that identify walking and riding routes within a 5-10 minute zone of a given school

DATE IMPLEMENTED: Not available

COST: Not available

ADDITIONAL INFORMATION:

Suite of programs to help break down the barriers that prevent more students from staying active on their journey to school. Culminates in National Ride2School Day.

RESULTS OF EVALUATION: Not available

09/01/2023 View
Active Travel to School Program: School Crossing Supervisors
Transport Canberra and City Services

PROGRAM FEATURES: 

School crossing supervisors (lollipop people) to assist children to cross roads safely by directing traffic with a stop sign and providing instructions. They also help to manage the flow of pedestrians and motorists at the busiest crossings.

DATE IMPLEMENTED: 1 January 2018

COST OF PROGRAM: $700,000 per year

COST FOR USERS: None

ADDITIONAL INFORMATION:

Part of program incorporating infrastructure, signage (Active Streets), training and other resources (Ride or Walk to School) to encourage children to use active travel to get to and from school.

RESULTS OF EVALUATION: Not available

09/01/2023 View
Active Travel to School Program: Active Streets for Schools (ACT)
Transport Canberra and City Services

PROGRAM FEATURES: 

  • Infrastructure improvements around schools
  • Stencils along popular walking and riding paths to promote walking and riding to school

DATE IMPLEMENTED: 1 July 2015

COST OF PROGRAM: $500,000 per year

COST FOR USERS: None

ADDITIONAL INFORMATION:

Infrastructure improvements include a combination of upgrades to existing infrastructure and new works, focusing on paths, crossings and treatments to slow vehicle speeds.

Blue stencils are installed along paths to provide wayfinding signage to local schools. The stencils give families the peace of mind the route to school is safe and easy to follow.

The stencils promote:

  • safe crossing locations (e.g. underpasses, dedicated crossings, traffic signals, refuge islands)
  • a safety in numbers approach by encouraging families to use similar routes
  • active school environments, which generate awareness within the community and encourage motorists to slow down.

Part of program incorporating training and other resources (Ride or Walk to School), and safety at school crossings (School Crossing Supervisors) to encourage children to use active travel to get to and from school.

RESULTS OF EVALUATION: Report

09/01/2023 View
Safer Speeds Case Study - City of Yarra, Melbourne

STREET NAMES: Treatment area located between Alexandra Parade (north), Hoddle Street (east), Johnston Street (south) and Nicholson Street (west)

SUBURBS: Fitzroy and Collingwood

MUNICIPALITY: City of Yarra, Melbourne

STATE & COUNTRY: Victoria, Australia

SPEED REDUCTION: From 40 km/h to 30 km/h

DATE IMPLEMENTED: December 2019

SCHEME INCLUDED: 

  • Widening of footpaths to include alfresco dining
  • Painted on road bike sharrows in each direction
  • Wombat crossings on roundabouts
  • Reduction of traffic lanes from two to one
  • Activation of Laneways which lead to off street parking
  • Installation of dwell-time infrastructure- seating, public art
  • Wombat Crossings midblock
  • Improvement to Pavement/kerb and channel to allow easy access for everyone

COST: Not available

ADDITIONAL INFORMATION:

Non-treatment area for control purposes located adjacent to the treatment area.

WHY?

  • Lower speed limit and changes to intersection layout = reduce likelihood and severity of crash types
  • Widened Zebra crossings provide pedestrian priority and consolidate pedestrian movement

LESSONS LEARNED:

The scheme included signage only. With additional infrastructure calming measures such as curb extensions, speed bumps, intersection platforms, further speed reduction improvements would be expected.

The choice control region for this study was not seen as ideal.

20/12/2022
Safer Speeds Case Study - Wellington, New Zealand
Wellington City Council

STREET NAME: Most central city streets (not main through roads)

SUBURB: Wellington

COUNTRY: New Zealand

SPEED REDUCTION: From 50 km/h to 30 km/h

DATE IMPLEMENTED: June 2020.80% of roads within Wellington approved to have speeds recuced to 30 kph Septmber 2022

SCHEME INCLUDED: 

  • 30 km/h signs
  • traffic calming e.g. raised pedestrian crossings

COST: $NZ44.8 million (from September 2022)

ADDITIONAL INFORMATION:

  • Road deaths have almost halved (down by 47 per cent) in the following 18-month period from June 2020

RESULTS OF EVALUATION: Not available

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Safer Speeds Case Study - Auckland City Centre
Auckland Transport

STREET NAME: Multiple

SUBURB: Auckland

COUNTRY: New Zealand

SPEED REDUCTION: Mostly from 50 km/h to 30 km/h

DATE IMPLEMENTED: 30 June 2020

SCHEME INCLUDED: 

  • Physical speed calming measures (such as speed tables and raised pedestrian crossings)
  • Re-marked parking spaces allowing for greater width
  • Side island pedestrian refuges
  • Slow speed markings
  • 30 km/h signs
  • Re-allocation of road space to remove some parking spaces and add others elsewhere
  • Pram crossings
  • Speed bumps
  • Gateway treatments at town centre entrance including side islands and painted '30' markings
  • Built out kerbs
  • Move bus stops to enable easier access by buses
  • Introduction of 30 minute waiting parking spaces
  • Separated on-road cycleway
  • New improved layout and pavements around high-conflict areas (example driveways to parking area)
  • New bus shelters
  • New bike parking facilities
  • New wayfinding signages
  • Widening seaside path from 2.4 metres to 4 metres and turning into a shared path wide enough for cyclists and pedestrians
  • Removed painted flush median and remark the road to make space for wider shared path

COST: $NZ 49,297,544 (includes reduction of speed limits on all roads including urban and rural)

ADDITIONAL INFORMATION:

  • Road deaths have almost halved (down by 47 per cent) in the following 18-month period.
  • Residents surveyed felt that the speed limit changes, and engineering measures have made the local town centres safer.
  • They also gave significantly higher safety ratings across all five individual aspects of road safety following the introduction of the speed calming measures, including:
    • Safety around schools;
    • Safety around the area (excluding schools);
    • Pedestrian friendliness;
    • Cyclist friendliness; and
    • People driving under the speed limit
  • The speed calming measures have had the biggest impact on how often people are walking in their local area.
  • 19% of residents surveyed state they are now participating in at least one active mode activity more often since implementation

LESSONS LEARNED:

  • Engage with Māori as partners and not as stakeholders

RESULTS OF EVALUATION: Not available

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Safer Speeds Case Study - High Pedestrian Activity Areas, NSW
Transport for NSW

LOCATION: Multiple

SUBURB: Multiple

MUNICIPALITY: Multiple

STATE & COUNTRY: New South Wales, Australia

SPEED REDUCTION: Various to 40 km/h

DATE IMPLEMENTED: 2003

SCHEME INCLUDED: 

  • Signage
  • Traffic calming: chicanes, narrow carriageways and half openings; pedestrian fencing, refuges and raised crossings; gateway treatments includign differentiation through painting, paving rasied platforms; kerb extensions, blisters and good landscaoing; illuminated or flashing lights; speed humps
  • Promotion through roadside signage, letterbox drops, local media coverage and campaigns

COST: Not available

ADDITIONAL INFORMATION:

  • Casualty crashes: a 37.6% reduction in crashes 2002-2015 for High Pedestrain Activity Areas (HPAA) compared to a 20.4% reduction on comparable 40/50/60 km/h roads elsewhere
  • Serious casualty crashes: a 33.0% reduction in crashes 2005-2015 for HPAA compared to a 3.6% reduction on comparable 40/50/60 km/h roads elsewhere
  • Pedestrian serious casualty crashes: a 46.4% reduction in crashes 2005-2015 for HPAA compared to a 19.1% reduction on comparable 40/50/60 km/h roads elsewhere
  • For zones where implementation dates were known, a reduction of 12.5% to 16.4% in casualty crashes in the three to five years after implementation of HPAA zones compared to the three to five years before implementation.

LESSONS LEARNED:

  • HPAA zones demonstrated greater percentage reductions in casualty crashes compared with other permanent 40 km/h zones and also included roads with a far greater number of pedestrian and other crashes therefore achieving far greater reductions in absolute numbers of casualties
  • Stakeholders reported that introduction of permanent 40 km/h zones results in a reduction in crashes, a reduction in travel speeds and some reduction in motorised traffic.
  • Overall opinions of 40 km/h zones were mixed depending on whether individuals placed greater value on mobility compared with safety and amenity
  • The community survey indicated strong support for 40 km/h on busy roads where lots of people were walking.
  • The HPAA program guidelines are complex and put significant boundaries around implementation. They can be usefully revised to reflect learnings and support continued safety improvement.
  • Change management is a critical element of any speed management reform, and should be a key consideration in implementing lower speed limits.
  • There is good potential in taking some smaller intermediate steps, ahead of a more significant program to capitalise upon the success of the HPAA program.E.g.:
    • Consistency of zoning and signage
    • relax pedestrian crossing warrants (criteria) in HPAA zones
    • Trial 40 km/h zones without traffic calming treatments
    • Trial part-time zones
20/12/2022 View
Safer Speeds Case Study - Melbourne Shopping Strips
Department of Transport, Victoria

LOCATION: Multiple busy shopping strip centres

SPEED REDUCTION: 50 km/h to 40km/h

MUNICIPALITY: Multiple

STATE & COUNTRY: Victoria, Australia

SCHEME INCLUDED: 

  • Electronic variable speed signs
  • Advance warning signs

DATE IMPLEMENTED: Various

COST: Not available

ADDITIONAL INFORMATION: Introduced in areas of high pedestrian activity

LESSONS LEARNED:

  • There was a 14% average reduction in the rate of all casualty crashes (per km per day) after introduction of the 40 km/h zones
  • The reductions in crash rate were similar for crashes occurring at midblock locations (17% reduction in crashes per km per day), however there was no significant reduction in crashes at signalised intersections
  • The casualty crash reduction was largest for casualty crashes that involved vehicles only (20% reduction in the incidence rate)
  • There was no significant effect on the incidence rate of pedestrian-involved crashes
  • There was no statistically significant change in the rate of cyclist-involved crashes
  • There was a 14% reduction in the rate of cyclist-involved casualty crashes at midblock locations and a 48% increase in the rate of crashes involving cyclists at signalised intersections.
  • The greates reduction in crashes occurred on straight roads, with sheltered parking on both sides of the road and with fewer off-street parking facilities
  • Crash reduction was greater on roads without a painted chevron median (that is, roads with either no median, a raised island median, or a median with a tram) and without a tertiary education institution present.
  • The odds of a casualty crash reduction occurring after treatment were almost five times higher on roads with railway stations compared to roads without railway stations.
20/12/2022 View
Safer Speeds Case Study - Melbourne
City of Melbourne

STREET NAME: Local roads across inner Melbourne

SUBURB: Melbourne

MUNICIPALITY: City of Melbourne

STATE & COUNTRY: Victoria, Australia

SPEED REDUCTION: From 50 km/h to 40 km/h

DATE IMPLEMENTED: September 2022 - ongoing

SCHEME INCLUDED: 

  • Speed limit signs
  • Variable Message Signs placed at strategic locations in the area to advise of the new speed limit
  • Yellow and black ‘New Speed Limit’ signs for at least six months after the launch

COST: Not available

ADDITIONAL INFORMATION:

  • Provides consistent speed limits

RESULTS OF EVALUATION: Not available

19/12/2022 View
Safer Speeds Case Study - Little Streets, Melbourne
City of Melbourne

STREET NAME: One-way sections of Flinders Lane, Little Collins Street, Little Bourke Street and Little Lonsdale Street

SUBURB: Melbourne

MUNICIPALITY: City of Melbourne

STATE & COUNTRY: Victoria, Australia

SPEED REDUCTION: From 40 km/h to 20 km/h

DATE IMPLEMENTED: September 2020

SCHEME INCLUDED: 

  • Speed limit signs

COST: Not available

ADDITIONAL INFORMATION:

  • People walking along the city’s little streets have right of way over vehicles and bikes

RESULTS OF EVALUATION: Not available

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Safer Speeds Case Study - City of Charles Sturt, South Australia
City of Charles Sturt

STREET NAME: Multiple

SUBURB: Multiple

MUNICIPALITY: City of Chalres Sturt, Adelaide

STATE & COUNTRY: South Australia, Australia

SPEED REDUCTION: From 40 km/h to 30 km/h

DATE IMPLEMENTED: 2012

SCHEME INCLUDED: 

  • Speed limit signs
  • Community consultation

COST: $5,000-$10,000

ADDITIONAL INFORMATION:

  • Reduction in driver speeds (85th percentile speeds reduced by 4.27km/h, from 48.0km/h to 43.7km/h)
  • Trafic volumes and crash numbers reduced (small sample)
  • 55% of those who live in a new 40km/h area, do not support the change in speed limit with suburbs closest to the Adelaide CBD being mostly in support, and those suburbs furthest from the CBD being mostly against
  • Some residents feel that the speed limits are confusing, ignored, inconvenient, revenue raising, increase road rage and add too much time to their trips, and that they don’t improve amenity, safety for all road users or reduce the chance of crashes
  • Most residents who are against the 40km/h areas do not agree that drivers travel too fast, or that they don’t look out for pedestrians or cyclists on their streets
  • Most residents who are in support are those who perceive driving behaviour to be an issue on their local street
  • Residents are slightly less supportive now, compared to before the 40 areas were installed
  • Support is strongest among young families, females, older residents and active transport users
  • Opinions are mixed about whether more police enforcement is necessary
  • Residents feel that the current number of signs is enough, but some feel they should be placed in clearer locations
  • Only 30% feel that speed limits on their own are enough, and many would also like roundabouts, speed humps, chicanes or raised intersections
  • Most feel that 40km/h areas are one of the least effective ways to reduce speed
  • 3 in 4 residents feel that the 40km/h area has had a positive impact on their safety, but 4 in 5 report a negative impact on their travel
  • Suburbs that are largely opposed, report that the negative impact on their travel is higher than the positive impact on their safety

LESSONS LEARNED:

  • Confusion is areas where speed limit changes multiple times

RESULTS OF EVALUATION: Not available

19/12/2022 View
Safer Speeds Case Study - City of Vincent, Perth
City of Vincent

STREET NAME: Local residential streets in the areas bounded by Newcastle, Vincent and Charles Streets and the Swan River (does not include main distributor roads)

SUBURB: Southern suburbs of City of Vincent (Highgate, Mount Lawley)

MUNICIPALITY: City of Vincent, Perth

STATE & COUNTRY: Western Australia, Australia

SPEED REDUCTION: From 50 km/h to 40 km/h

DATE IMPLEMENTED: April 2019

SCHEME INCLUDED: 

  • Two year trial period
  • Community consultation prior to trial starting
  • 40 km/h signs

COST: Not available

ADDITIONAL INFORMATION:

  • Main distributor roads will stay at their current speed limits, with the exception of part of Vincent Street near the Hyde Park water playground

RESULTS OF EVALUATION: Not available

19/12/2022 View
Safer Speeds Case Study - Fremantle, Western Australia
City of Fremantle

STREET NAME: Multiple (40 km/h zone) and South Terrace (30 km/h)

SUBURB: Fremantle

MUNICIPALITY: City of Fremantle

STATE & COUNTRY: Western Australia, Australia

SPEED REDUCTION: From 50 km/h to 40 km/h (zone) and 30 km/h (South Terrace)

DATE IMPLEMENTED: July 2021

SCHEME INCLUDED: 

  • Speed limit signs
  • Temporary speed bumps (South Terrace)
  • Permanent traffic calming
  • Streetscape upgrades
  • Upgrades to road drainage
  • Improved sightlines at intersections
  • Replacing ashphalt footpaths with concrete
  • Upgrading tree pits to ensure better infiltration
  • Tree planting
  • Damaged infrastructure replaced
  • Resurfaced road pavement

COST: Not available

ADDITIONAL INFORMATION:

No formal evaluation or after studies to measure impact, however a lot of community support for lower speeds, particularly along South Terrace.

LESSONS LEARNED:

Used to test Main Roads WA new speed limit policy.

RESULTS OF EVALUATION: Not available

19/12/2022 View
Safer Speeds Case Study - Bayswater, Western Australia

STREET NAME: Railway Parade and Whatley Crescent

SUBURB: Bayswater

MUNICIPALITY: City of Bayswater, Perth

STATE & COUNTRY: Western Australia, Australia

SPEED REDUCTION: From 50 km/h to 30 km/h

DATE IMPLEMENTED: January 2020 (trial start October 2018)

SCHEME INCLUDED: 

  • 30km/h signs

COST: Not available

ADDITIONAL INFORMATION:

Temporary reduction while increased number of bike riders on road due to modifications to adjacent railway line and Principal Shared Path

RESULTS OF EVALUATION: Not available

19/12/2022
Safer Speeds Case Study - Manly & Liverpool, NSW
Transport for NSW

STREET NAME: Multiple

SUBURB: Manly and Liverpool

MUNICIPALITY: Northern Beaches Council and Liverpool City Council

STATE & COUNTRY: New South Wales, Australia

SPEED REDUCTION: From 40 km/h to 30 km/h

DATE IMPLEMENTED: July 2020

SCHEME INCLUDED: 

  • Replacement of speed limit signs with 30km/h signs
  • 30 km/h orange school zone signs in school areas
  • Road markings

COST: Not available

RESULTS OF EVALUATION: Not available

19/12/2022 View
Safer Speeds Case Study - Sydney CBD
Transport for NSW

STREET NAME: Multiple

SUBURB: Sydney

MUNICIPALITY: City of Sydney

STATE & COUNTRY: New South Wales, Australia

SPEED REDUCTION: From 50 km/h to 40 km/h

DATE IMPLEMENTED: 2016, August 2019

SCHEME INCLUDED: 

  • Speed limit signs
  • Pavement markings
  • Communicaions campaign
  • Monitoring
  • Sydney CBD Motorcycle Reponse team: a group pof highway patrol officers dedicated to improving pedestrain safety

COST: Not available

ADDITIONAL INFORMATION:

  • 46% reduction in pedestrain serious casualty crashes since 2016
  • Approximately 33% reduction in crashes causing fatalities and serious injuries In high pedestrian areas
  • Removed multiple speed limit changes on high-traffic routes

RESULTS OF EVALUATION: Not available

19/12/2022 View
Safer Speeds Case Study - Brisbane
Brisbane City Council

STREET NAME: 1. Ann Street (between Creek Street and the Riverside Expressway);

2. Village precint:

  • Old Cleveland Road and Logan Road, Stones Corner (between Montague Street and the O’Keefe Street roundabout)
  • Oxley Road, Corinda (between the Hassall Street and Martindale Street intersections).

3. Station Road, Indooroopilly

4. Flinders Parade, Sandgate

5. Kelvin Grove Urban Village

SUBURB: Brisbane

MUNICIPALITY: Brisbane City Council

STATE & COUNTRY: Queensland, Australia

SPEED REDUCTION: 1 & 2. From 60 km/h to 40 km/h

3-5. From 50 km/h to 40 km/h

DATE IMPLEMENTED: 1. November 2018

2. May 2019

3 & 4. September 2019

5. Febraury 2020

SCHEME INCLUDED: 

  • Highly visible speed limit signage
  • Road markings

COST: Not available

ADDITIONAL INFORMATION:

LESSONS LEARNED:

RESULTS OF EVALUATION: Not available

19/12/2022 View
Safer Speeds Case Study - Safe Active Streets, Perth, Western Australia
Department of Transport, WA

STREET NAME: Multiple

SUBURB: Multiple

MUNICIPALITY: Multiple

STATE & COUNTRY: Western Australia, Australia

SPEED REDUCTION: From 50 km/h to 30 km/h

DATE IMPLEMENTED: September 2017 - ongoing

SCHEME INCLUDED: 

  • Connections to off-road shared paths
  • Links community amenites e.g. schools, railway stations, shops
  • Blue and white Safe Active Street road patches at major entry points
  • 30 km/h speed limit signs
  • Raised platforms at intersections
  • Single-lane slow points
  • Narrowing street widths by introducing on-street parking and plantings
  • Changing stop/give-way signs to give priority to movements along the Safe Active Street
  • Using traffic islands and medians to restrict car movements at intersections, while allowing movements in all directions for people on bikes and on foot
  • Introducing new pedestrian or bike crossings
  • Introducing bicycle symbol road markings in the centre of each unmarked lane, to encourage cyclists to take the lane
  • Lateral shifts in the carriageway to reduce sightlines (i.e. swapping formalised on-street parking and new tree planting nibs from one side of the street to the other
  • Additional tree planting and landscaping make them more attractive places to walk or ride

COST: Not available

ADDITIONAL INFORMATION:

Evaluation currently being undertaken and is due to be released in 2023.

LESSONS LEARNED:

Scheme is ongoing, with more locations continually being added. Lessons from previous implementations are being introduced for each one.

RESULTS OF EVALUATION: Not yet available (due 2023)

19/12/2022 View
Active Transport Strategy
Transport for NSW

The NSW Government wants walking and bike riding, known as active transport, to be the preferred way to make short trips and a viable, safe and efficient option for longer trips.  We estimate that more than 1.5 billion walking and bike riding trips are taken per year across New South Wales. We want to double this number in 20 years.

NSW Government’s Future Transport Strategy sets the vision for safe, healthy, sustainable, accessible and integrated journeys in NSW.

This Active Transport Strategy draws on the Future Transport Strategy and its vision for walking, bike riding and personal mobility. The Strategy provides a plan to guide planning, investment and priority actions for active transport across NSW. 

16/12/2022 View
Safer Speeds Case Study - Warnambool, Victoria

STREET NAME: Liebig Street between Raglan Parade and Merri Street

SUBURB: Warnambool

MUNICIPALITY: City of Warrnambool

STATE & COUNTRY: Victoria, Australia

SPEED REDUCTION: From 40 km/h to 30 km/h

DATE IMPLEMENTED: December 2019

SCHEME INCLUDED: 

  • Widening of footpaths to include alfresco dining
  • Painted on road bike sharrows in each direction
  • Wombat crossings on roundabouts
  • Reduction of traffic lanes from two to one
  • Activation of Laneways which lead to off street parking
  • Installation of dwell-time infrastructure- seating, public art
  • Wombat Crossings midblock
  • Improvement to Pavement/kerb and channel to allow easy access for everyone

COST: Not available

ADDITIONAL INFORMATION:

The projects’ infrastructure has successfully created a welcoming pedestrian priority experience in the City Centre.

From the data:

Reduction in speed to under 30km/hr:

  • 2021 85%tile- 25.4km/hr
  • 2018 85%tile- 38.3km/hr

Liebig Street Crashes (2011-2015): Pedestrian - 4 (2 aged 70+), Car - 2, Bicycle - 1

Liebig Street Crashes (2016-2020) (*note construction was 2018/19 and COVID): Car - 2

Safe Systems Road Safety Rating Improvement: Liebig/Koriot- 114 to 87 and Liebig/Lava- 113.5 to 82

WHY?

  • Lower speed limit and changes to intersection layout = reduce likelihood and severity of crash types
  • Widened Zebra crossings provide pedestrian priority and consolidate pedestrian movement

LESSONS LEARNED:

The scheme included signage only. With additional infrastructure calming measures such as curb extensions, speed bumps, intersection platforms, further speed reduction improvements would be expected.

The choice control region for this study was not seen as ideal.

06/10/2022
Safer Speeds Case Study - Fitzroy & Collingwood, Victoria

STREET NAME: Treatment area located between Alexandra Parade (north), Hoddle Street (east), Johnston Street (south) and Nicholson Street (west)

SUBURB: Fitzroy and Collingwood

MUNICIPALITY: City of Yarra, Melbourne

STATE & COUNTRY: Victoria, Australia

SPEED REDUCTION: From 40 km/h to 30 km/h

DATE IMPLEMENTED: January 2020 (trial start October 2018)

SCHEME INCLUDED: 

  • Implementation of trial area (30km/h) and control area (40km/h)
  • Replacement of speed limit signs with 30km/h signs
  • Pavement marking
  • 91 sites where speeds were recorded

COST: Not available

ADDITIONAL INFORMATION:

  • Modest reductions in mean speed: average travel speed fell by 0.3km/h
  • Reductions were more apparent at higher speeds where risk of severe injury or death to vulnerable users is more likely
  • Unexpected speed reductions in adjacent control sites
  • “Treatment effect” showed 11% reduction of likelihood of a vehicle travelling above 40km/h in treatment area and 25% reduction above 50km/h
  • 4% reduction in risk of severe injury for pedestrians
  • Increase of people supporting the 30km/h area from 42.7% to 50.3% within the trial area

Observations of pedestrian and cyclist activity were undertaken at a limited number of locations within the treatment and non-treatment areas during three days before the trial implementation and three days at 12 months into the trial. The small number of locations and survey days limits the ability for general conclusions. The data shows a 12.7% drop in pedestrian activity (largely driven by a single site) and a 27.8% increase in cycling activity.

LESSONS LEARNED:

For some members of the community there was confusion about how the pedestrian priority at the crossings worked, how to determine when to enter and how to exit the roundabout.

There are feelings of frustration caused by inconvenience to the driving experience which are perceived to be caused by the Wombat Crossings.

Intercept surveys at the Wombat Crossings found people using them thought they created a more convenient walking experience however there was still concern about understanding how the crossings worked and the expectations of people walking and people driving.

Information about the benefits of the crossings and the expectations of all road users would assist the community to understand the role they play in creating a pedestrian priority city centre.

06/10/2022
CWANZ Design Innovations Working Group Practice Note: Contraflow Cycling in Quiet Streets
CWANZ

The CWANZ Design Innovations Working Group undertook a review of contraflow cycling lanes in quiet streets. This report presents the evidence, technical advice, and implementation and design. Examples of streets with contraflow cycling lanes in Australia and New Zealand are given.

06/10/2022 View
Speed management guide: Road to Zero Edition
Waka Kotahi NZTA

The Speed management guide: Road to Zero edition supports regional transport committees, regional councils and road controlling authorities
to develop high-quality speed management plans that will deliver safe and appropriate speed limits in line with Te Ara ki te Ora – Road to Zero
(New Zealand’s road safety strategy to 2030) and the Land Transport Rule: Setting of Speed Limits 2022.


12/08/2022 View
Safer Speeds Case Studies - Gold Coast, Queensland
City of Gold Coast

LOCATION:

Cavill Avenue/Orchid Avenue, Surfers Paradise
Hedges Avenue/Old Burleigh Road, Mermaid Beach
Garfield Terrace/Northcliffe Terrace, Surfers Paradise
Jefferson Lane, Palm Beach
James Street, Burleigh Heads
Connor Street, Burleigh Heads
Pacific Parade, Tugun
Griffith Street, Coolangatta
Thomas Drive, Chervon Island
Cloyne Road, Southport
Marshall Lane, Southport
Tedder Avenue, Main Road
Broadbeach area – Queensland Avenue, Albert Avenue, Old Burleigh Road, Victoria Avenue, Surf Parade and Charles Avenue

SPEED REDUCTION: Various – some 50 km/h to 40km/h, 50km/h to 30km/h and 40km/h to 30km/h

MUNICIPALITY: City of Gold Coast

STATE & COUNTRY: Queensland, Australia

SCHEME INCLUDED: 

  • Signs and lines
  • Raised crossings and wombats
  • Contraflow bicycle lanes
  • Placemaking

DATE IMPLEMENTED: Various

COST: Noted as low-cost initiative in the Gold Coast Road Safety Plan 2021-2026
Speed reviews done internally (although Department of Transport and Main Roads grants available for these speed reviews) and minimal operational budget required for signs and linemarking and threshold treatments if required.

ADDITIONAL INFO: General support and now going back to some 50km/h to 40km/h zones and undertaking further reviews to reduce to 30km/h

LESSONS LEARNED:

  • Lesson around now going straight to 30km/h, rather than 50km/h to 40km/h and then second review 40km/h to 30km/h (this has come from taking a conservative approach initially and now being more comfortable with going straight to 30km/h following the speed limit review process documented in MUTCD Part 4.
  • Tools now support 30km/h (MUTCD Part 4)
  • Importance of looking at a broader area, get the data and use engineering knowhow to develop consistent precinct wide approach for speed limits
  • Queensland Police Service supportive of 30km/h (note they have had challenges enforcing loud cars in café precinct but can enforce speed breach)
  • Importance of working with community and Councillors, and that when the speed reduction requests come via their offices, they are more supportive/less concerned
  • Value of placemaking project supporting traffic speed changes in centre projects
19/07/2022 View
CWANZ Design Innovations Working Group: Use of Banana Deflection Rails
CWANZ

The CWANZ Design Innovations Working Group undertook a review of the use of banana deflection rails (banana bars) in Australia. In undertaking this review, they considered the Traffic and Road Use Management Volume1–Guide to Traffic Management Part 6: Intersections, Interchanges and Crossings (2020) prepared by the Queensland Department of Transport and Main Roads (TMR), and Municipal Infrastructure Standards (MIS) 05 – Active Travel Facilities Design, prepared by Transport Canberra City Services (TCCS).

12/07/2022 View
Municipal Design Standard Drawings
Transport Canberra City Services

The ACT Standard Drawings support the Municipal Infrastructure Design Standards and Technical Specifications. The Standard Drawings have been designed to be read in conjunction with the relevant referenced Municipal Infrastructure Standards (MIS) and Municipal Infrastructure Technical Specifications (MITS).

The Standard Drawings provide detailed pictorial guidance for ACT civil assets, and reflects the most up-to-date industry practice.

The design of and construction of municipal assets in the ACT must be in accordance with the Municipal Infrastructure Design Standards and Technical Specifications. Where any differences in practice exist between the Standard Drawings and the Municipal Infrastructure Standard, the later will prevail.

08/07/2022 View
Road Planning and Design Manual
Department of Transport and Main Roads, Queensland

The Road Planning and Design Manual is the Queensland Department of Transport and Main Roads' primary reference for the planning and design of roads. It refers designers to the relevant Austroads publications for technical requirements, and outlines where Queensland Department of Transport and Main Roads practice supplements or differs from the Austroads guides.

08/07/2022 View
Municipal Infrastructure Design Standards (MIS)
Transport Canberra City Services

The Municipal Infrastructure Standards (MIS) utilise the AusSpec document framework. This framework provides a level of design consistency across all local government jurisdictions in Australia, and reflects the most up-to-date industry practice. A number of local and regional government jurisdictions have adopted the AusSpec document framework as the primary technical framework for their design standards.

08/07/2022 View
Queensland Guide to Traffic Management
Department of Transport and Main Roads, Queensland

The Queensland Guide to Traffic Management (QGTM) is issued under the authority of Section 166 of the Transport Operations (Road Use Management) Act 1995. The contents of QGTM are issued as 'approved notices' under Section 166(2) of said Act.

The Department of Transport and Main Roads has adopted Austroads' Guide to Traffic Management (AGTM) 2020 as part of national harmonisation. As a result, the QGTM will only provide requirements and recommendations specific to Queensland and has precedence over the equivalent Austroads Part.

08/07/2022 View
Movement & Place and the design of safe & successful places
iMove

Future Transport Strategy 2056 sets the 40-year vision and framework for customer mobility in NSW. As part of this vision, the Strategy recognises the importance of shaping our future transport spaces to ensure balance between movement and place.

To support the development of successful places, the Movement & Place Framework promotes the urban design principles that allow local communities to come together in places with vehicle movement, thereby supporting social and economic growth.

The purpose of this research is to use the Movement & Place Framework and Safe System approach to develop a series of evidence-based design principles and guidelines for balancing vehicle movement and place-making, to enhance the development of safe and successful places.

Using virtual reality (VR) and pedestrian tracking technology, the project aims to better understand relationships between pedestrian-oriented urban design elemental variables and safe system treatments to improve the human experience and safety of pedestrians.

Outcomes from this research will facilitate the implementation and evaluation of successful places in collaboration with local councils to determine the real-life impact of different place-making and safety variables.

14/06/2022 View
Movement and Place
Transport for NSW

Movement and Place is a cross-government framework for planning, designing and managing our transport networks to maximise benefits for the people and places they serve.

14/06/2022 View
CWANZ Fact Sheet: Safety
CWANZ

Research has repeatedly shown that the more people walking or riding a bike, the safer it is for everyone. Reducing the number of cars and speed limits in built-up areas reduces the risk of death or injury to our most vulnerable road users. Growth in cycling is best achieved through separated cycle lanes and reduced speed limits.

28/04/2022 View
CWANZ Fact Sheet: Economic Benefits of Walking & Cycling
CWANZ

We can save millions of dollars in reduced health and congestion costs by increasing the number of people that walk or ride a bike for every day trips and reducing the number of people that drive.

19/04/2022 View
CWANZ Fact Sheet: Benefits of Lower Speed Limits
CWANZ

 Benefits of lower speed limits in high activity areas and local access streets. What happens when vehicles travel more slowly in areas with lots of pedestrians and bike riders?

19/04/2022 View
CWANZ Fact Sheet: Health Benefits of Active Transport
CWANZ

Physical inactivity is one of the top 10 risk factors contributing to disease in Australia, contributing to 2.5% of the total burden of disease and is the 5th highest behavioural risk factor, behind tobacco use, diet, alcohol and illicit drug use.

19/04/2022 View
CWANZ Fact Sheet: Costs of Transport and Physical Inactivity
CWANZ

Congestion costs, transport costs and healthcare costs of physical inactivity.

13/04/2022 View
CWANZ Fact Sheet: More People Bike Riding - Keys to Success
CWANZ

When bike riding is easy, safe and more convenient than other transport options, more people will ride. Increasing physical activity improves health, saves costs and takes the
pressure off other forms of transport, benefitting the entire community.

13/04/2022 View
CWANZ Factsheet: More People Walking - Keys to Success
CWANZ

Walking is for everyone, regardless of age and ability. Walkers include people on foot, people with crutches, people with canes, people in wheelchairs, and people in mobility scooters. Evidence consistently shows that by providing pedestrian-friendly neighbourhoods, quality public spaces, a mix of land uses, and housing densities, more people will walk, giving health, environmental, transport and community benefits.

13/04/2022 View
NSW State Infrastructure Strategy
Infrastructure NSW

The State Infrastructure Strategy is a 20-year infrastructure investment plan for the NSW Government that places strategic fit and economic merit at the centre of investment decisions.

The strategy assesses infrastructure problems and solutions, and provides recommendations to best grow the State's economy, enhance productivity and improve living standards for our NSW community. It is updated every five years.

12/04/2022 View
Cycling Propensity
Transport for NSW

This dataset contains the propensity index for cycling across different areas. It also contains the report that examines spatial relationship between areas with high propensity for cycling with high concentrations of short distance car trips.

12/04/2022 View
Road rules for bicycle riders
Transport for NSW
12/04/2022 View
Active Transport to School
Transport for NSW
12/04/2022 View
Trip Planner
Transport for NSW
12/04/2022 View
Bike It Baw Baw: Cyclist Safety Issues in the Baw Baw Shire
Monash University Accident Research Centre

The aim of the study was to identify the issues in Baw Baw Shire in Gippsland, Victoria, related to the safety of on-road cyclists. Safety concerns specific to the Baw Baw Shire are identified and potential countermeasures that may improve cyclist safety are discussed.

12/04/2022 View
Cyclists and red lights – a study of the behaviour of commuter cyclist in Melbourne
The National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine

The primary aim of this research was to investigate the behaviours of cyclists and their interactions with vehicles at signalised intersections.The results focus on the three types of behaviour at red lights. Males were more likely to continue through the red light than females and the majority of males who rode through red lights were runners. The findings are important as they differentiate between the types of red light running behaviour and highlight factors influencing cyclists risk exposure.

12/04/2022 View
Cyclist bunch riding: a review of the literature
Monash University Accident Research Centre

This report is a review of the literature on cyclists who ride in large groups or bunches on public roads. The research was conducted following the Victorian State Coroner’s investigation into the death of an elderly pedestrian, following a collision with a cyclist who was riding in a bunch. The aims of the review were to understand the behaviour of bunch riders, particularly the behaviours that may contribute to increased risk of collision and to make recommendations for effective enforcement and countermeasure strategies for this road user group.

12/04/2022 View
Naturalistic cycling study: identifying risk factors for on-road commuter cyclists
Amy Gillett Foundation

This study identified risk factors for collisions/near-collisions involving on-road commuter cyclists and drivers. A naturalistic cycling study was conducted in Melbourne, Australia, with cyclists wearing helmet-mounted video cameras. Video recordings captured cyclists’ perspective of the road and traffic behaviours including head checks, reactions and manoeuvres.

12/04/2022 View
Painting a designated space: cyclist and driver compliance at cycling infrastructure at intersections
Amy Gillett Foundation

This study evaluated cyclist and driver compliance at cycling infrastructure at signalised intersections to determine the effectiveness of the infrastructure in creating a designated space for cyclists. A cross-sectional observational study was conducted during peak travel times at six sites in Melbourne in March 2009.

12/04/2022 View
The application of a naturalistic driving method to investigate on-road cyclist behaviour
Amy Gillett Foundation

The aim of this research was to investigate the behaviour of on-road commuter cyclists and their interactions with other road users in urban areas using a helmet-mounted video camera. Cycling is increasing in popularity popular in Australia; however, cyclists are physically vulnerable road users. To date, there has been little research on behavioural risk factors associated with collisions between cyclists and drivers, and much has relied on post-event data. Absent from this approach is an understanding of what contributed to collisions and near-collisions, in particular the behaviour of cyclists and drivers.

12/04/2022 View
Bicycle helmet use, an excerpt from – Cyclist safety: an investigation of how cyclists and drivers interact on the roads
Amy Gillett Foundation

The use of bicycle helmets by cyclists is widely supported amongst the injury prevention and health promotion communities.
There is extensive research that addresses the efficacy of helmets in reducing the severity of head injuries and several researchers who dispute the need or efficacy of helmets.

12/04/2022 View
Cyclist safety: an investigation of how cyclists and drivers interact on the roads
Monash University

Cyclists are vulnerable road users and the most severe injury outcomes for on-road cyclists are from collisions involving a motor vehicle. Research undertaken in this thesis aimed to identify contributing factors in unsafe cyclist-driver events to inform efforts to reduce the incidence of cyclist-driver crashes and cyclist injury severity outcomes.

12/04/2022 View
Riding through red lights: The rate, characteristics and risk factors of non-compliant urban commuter cyclists
Accident Analysis & Prevention

This study determined the rate and associated factors of red light infringement among urban commuter cyclists. A cross-sectional observational study was conducted using a covert video camera to record cyclists at 10 sites across metropolitan Melbourne, Australia from October 2008 to April 2009.

12/04/2022 View
Making bike safety research count
Amy Gillett Foundation

Given the lack of participation data and the underreporting of cyclist injury crashes, it is difficult to determine the magnitude of cyclist road trauma with any precision. This lack of data highlights the neglect in Australia of cyclist-focused monitoring that is essential to understanding injury rates and factors that contribute to cyclist crashes. The Amy Gillett Foundation (AGF) has developed a systematic policy development approach that identifies two issues: safe overtaking distances and cyclist-open vehicle door crashes, explored in this paper.

12/04/2022 View
MACCS Monash Alfred cyclist crash study
Monash University Accident Research Centre

Current primary data sources on mechanisms of Victorian bicycle crashes lack sufficient detail to draw clear conclusions on crash causation. Nor are these data adequate to link specific crash mechanisms to characteristic injury outcomes. The Monash Alfred Cycle Crash Study (MACCS) aimed to redress these data deficiencies through piloting an in-depth crash investigation study focused on cyclists. In-depth data were collected from 158 patients presenting to The Alfred and Sandringham Hospital Emergency Departments who were riders of bicycles involved in a crash. Information collected covered pre-crash factors pertaining to environment and cyclist/driver behaviour, crash mechanism, and injury outcomes from hospital records. Analyses of these data provide insight on crash causation and associated injury burdens which can inform the development, prioritisation and targeting of effective countermeasures.

12/04/2022 View
Why do cyclists infringe at red lights? An investigation of Australian cyclists’ reasons for red light infringement
Accident Analysis & Prevention

This study investigated the behavioural, attitudinal and traffic factors contributing to red light infringement by Australian cyclists using a national online survey. The survey was conducted from February to May 2010. In total, 2061 cyclists completed the survey and 37.3% reported that they had ridden through a signalised intersection during the red light phase. The main predictive characteristics for infringement were: gender with males more likely to offend than females (OR: 1.54, CI: 1.22–1.94); age with older cyclists less likely to infringe compared to younger cyclists 18–29 years (30–49 yrs: OR: 0.71, CI: 0.52–0.96; 50+ yrs: OR: 0.51, CI: 0.35–0.74), and; crash involvement with cyclists more likely to infringe at red lights if they had not previously been involved in a bicycle–vehicle crash while riding (OR: 1.35; CI: 1.10–1.65). The main reasons given for red light infringement were: to turn left (32.0%); because the inductive loop detector did not detect their bike (24.2%); when there was no other road users present (16.6%); at a pedestrian crossing (10.7%); and ‘Other’ (16.5%). A multinomial logistic regression model was constructed to examine the associations between cyclist characteristics and reasons for infringement. Findings suggest that some cyclists are motivated to infringe by their perception that their behaviour is safe and that infrastructure factors were associated with infringement. Ways to manage this, potentially risky, behaviour including behaviour programmes, more cyclist-inclusive infrastructure and enforcement are discussed.

12/04/2022 View
Road crashes involving bike riders in Victoria, 2002–2012
Amy Gillett Foundation

This study is a multi-year analysis of bicycle rider crash statistics undertaken using Victorian CrashStats. It clearly shows that there are distinct differences in the crash profiles of fatal bike rider crashes compared to non-fatal crashes.

12/04/2022 View
Bike Law
Amy Gillett Foundation

A bike rider’s guide to road rules in Victoria.

This guide outlines the essential road rules you need to know as a bike rider.
Whether you are on the road, on a path, riding in a group or heading out at night you need to know the road rules to ride responsibly and safely.

12/04/2022 View
Cycling Futures
University of Adelaide Press

The growing interest in cycling in Australia and New Zealand, as in other parts of the world, is underpinned by three major concerns: health and fitness, congestion and liveability, pollution and climate change.

Australasian researchers, practitioners, policy makers and community members are engaged in a global discussion on the role of cycling in addressing these concerns. Contributors to (this) book report on and extend this discussion as they explore the insights generated locally and internationally on the past, present and future of cycling.

The focus of the first half of the book is largely on the current engagement with cycling, challenges faced by existing and would-be cyclists and the issues cycling might address. The second half of the book is concerned with strategies and processes of change. Contributors working from different ontological positions reflect on changing socio-spatial relations to enable the broadest possible participation in cycling.

12/04/2022 View
Cycle Safe Communities
Amy Gillett Foundation

Cycle Safe Communities provides community groups, councils and organisations access to cycle safety campaign resources.

Developed by the Amy Gillett Foundation, Cycle Safe Communities enables consistent messaging about bike rider safety to be adopted and embedded in the Australian community. Everyone has the right to ride safely for work and play. A safer future is possible!

12/04/2022 View
Cycle Aware
University of Adelaide, Monash University and Queensland University of Technology

Cycle Aware is an Australia wide research project looking at how drivers learn to interact with cyclists. It focuses on the education and training received by people in the early stages of driving such as pre-learner, learner and probationary drivers. The ultimate aim of the project is to foster safer driver-cyclist interactions.

07/04/2022 View
Sharing Roads Safely: Vulnerable Road User Training
Amy Gillett Foundation

Sharing Roads Safely is a training course developed suitable for heavy vehicle drivers to increase safe interactions with vulnerable road users, specifically motorbike riders, cyclists and pedestrians.

Based on international best practice, the course was developed in consultation with the government, the heavy vehicle industry and vulnerable road user groups for drivers in Australia.

Sharing Roads Safely is a recognised training course and meets compliance requirements for vulnerable road user awareness training.

  • Designed for Australian drivers
  • Meets government project contract requirements for driver training
07/04/2022 View
BikeSpot
CrowdSpot and the Amy Gillett Foundation

Victoria is still striving to become a world-class cycling location. A lack of safety is the major barrier to people getting on their bikes. How it feels to ride a bicycle has an impact on people's willingness to ride.

BikeSpot 2020 provides the opportunity for all Victorians to share their perceptions of cycling safety and help develop new insights for the prioritisation of cycling safety improvements.

07/04/2022 View
Travel planning toolkit guidelines and resources
Waka Kotahi NZ Transport Agency

The Waka Kotahi NZ Transport Agency travel planning toolkit provides you with guidelines and resources to make business trips and staff travel to and from work more efficient. You will find links to many resources to help you develop your workplace travel plan.

07/04/2022 View
Walking and Cycling Improvements
Waka Kotahi NZ Transport Agency

Walking and cycling facilities help make cities and towns more liveable and support tourism. During 2018–21 about $390 million will be invested in walking and cycling initiatives, which will extend networks across the country and improve connections to a range of transport choices. This will improve safety and accessibility, and make a significant contribution to the revitalisation of town and city centres.

Improvments will be made to walking and cycling facilities along state highway corridors up and down the country, as part of our state highway improvement programme. This includes landscaping, new bridges and underpasses to establish safe routes to encourage more people to walk or cycle.

07/04/2022 View
Research Report 667 Developing methodologies for improving customer levels of service for walking
Waka Kotahi NZ Transport Agency

This research was commissioned as there is currently a gap in terms of national models and tools that provide customer levels of service information regarding the walkability of New Zealand’s transport networks.

The research aimed to determine the key factors that contribute to the quality and attractiveness of the pedestrian network, and to incorporate those in a consistent framework to inform the planning, design and operation of transport systems.

The report contains a Pedestrian Level of Service (PLOS) Framework that is applicable for network, street and journey assessments. 

07/04/2022 View
Research report 452 Predicting walkability
Waka Kotahi NZ Transport Agency

This research provides a number of mathematical formulas for predicting the quality of the walking environment from the perspective of the user using operational and physical variables. The formulas were derived by combining the perception data gathered from participants in the community street reviews with measurements of the walking environment.

The two main areas that were researched to enable the derivation of formulas were:

  • when walking along the road (path length)
  • when crossing the road (road crossing).

This research describes the process for obtaining the data and deriving the formulas, and recommends the formulas most suitable for practitioner use.

07/04/2022 View
Research report 440 Reducing pedestrian delay at traffic signals
Waka Kotahi NZ Transport Agency

Since 2000, the benefits of walking as a mode of travel have been recognised by the New Zealand government in a raft of policy statements and strategies. However, the Ministry of Transport acknowledges that there are a number of issues to overcome to encourage more walking. This research focuses on one of the key issues: namely, the delay experienced by pedestrians at traffic signals.

Historically, New Zealand's approach to pedestrian delay has been minimal, with pedestrian issues considered primarily from the point of view of safety, rather than level of service or amenity. At traffic signals, pedestrians are often accommodated in a way that causes the least amount of interruption to motorised traffic, and signal cycle times can be long, leading to excessive pedestrian waiting times. This can lead to frustration, causing pedestrians to violate the signals and use their own judgement to cross, resulting in safety risks.

This research, which was carried out between 2007 and 2010 in Auckland, Wellington and Christchurch, used techniques such as pedestrian attitude surveys, micro-simulation modelling and a literature review of international best practice to identify methods of reducing pedestrian delay at signalised intersections in these cities. The recommendations developed during the course of the research provide both technical and policy mechanisms for improving pedestrian delay in New Zealand's central-city areas.

07/04/2022 View
Research Report 439 Generation of walking, cycling and public transport trips: pilot study
Waka Kotahi NZ Transport Agency

This research investigated a method for collecting data relating to walk, cycle and public transport trips to land-use activities.

A method needed to be developed that would require a short questionnaire to ensure higher sample rates, while also providing reliable and consistent results. This data could subsequently be used in calculating trip rates for walk, cycle and public transport trips, when combined with trip rate units such as floor area.

Multi-modal trip data has been collected for some time in the UK. The survey method developed in this research was simpler than the UK method by interviewing in only one direction for the vast majority of land uses, apart from residential where the recommended method was to interview in both directions.

A face-to-face questionnaire method was developed over a series of different site surveys in Auckland, Wellington and Christchurch during 2010. The research also identified that collecting non-car mode trip information through purely observer methods was not sufficiently accurate and that simple questionnaire surveys were necessary with clear instructions from the survey organiser to ensure all relevant information would be collected.

07/04/2022 View
Research report 436 Benefits of new and improved pedestrian facilities - before and after studies
Waka Kotahi NZ Transport Agency

Walking is an essential mode of transport. New and improved pedestrian facilities promote walking and provide greater access and mobility within our communities.

The NZ Transport Agency has recently updated the procedures for the evaluation of pedestrian improvement projects. The benefit factor applying to new pedestrian trips was increased from $0.50 to $2.70/km, making pedestrian facility improvement projects more economically viable. Thus, estimating the increase in pedestrian flows (as opposed to simply recording existing pedestrian flows) is now important in the economic evaluation of new or improved facilities.

This research analysed case studies at eight New Zealand sites where the implementation of new pedestrian facilities (or the improvement of existing facilities) led to increased pedestrian usage and improved perception of the sites. The study recorded pedestrian rates both before and after facility implementation, and analysed accompanying factors such as safety, delay and directness. It also tried to develop an expected pedestrian-usage model, based on before and after data analysis, for planners and funding agents to use when planning new or improved facilities, and for use in project evaluation.

Finally, a monitoring database containing before and after pedestrian count data for various new and improved pedestrian facilities, along with a list of the accompanying factors mentioned above, was developed for future use.

07/04/2022 View
Research Report 435 Walking and cycling: improving combined use of physical activity/health and transport data
Waka Kotahi NZ Transport Agency

SPARC's Active New Zealand Survey (ANZS) is a high-quality nationwide survey of over 4000 adults collected through face-to-face interviews over 12 months in 2007/08. Although collected mainly to measure levels of sport/recreation activity and to quantify physical activity in general, it includes data of interest to the transport sector on walking and cycling.

This report uses the ANZS data to meet the following transport-related objectives:

  • quantifying how much walking/cycling by New Zealand adults is done mainly for transport purposes compared with sport/recreation purposes
  • quantifying the proportion of New Zealand adults meeting key health guideline for physical activity through active transport alone, and the proportion for whom active transport makes a clear contribution to them meeting such guidelines
  • establishing whether SPARC's ANZS and the Ministry of Transport's NZ Household Travel Survey deliver broadly comparable estimates of transport-related walking and cycling
  • recommending refinements to collection, analysis, and interpretation of transport and physical activity/health data for the benefit of both sectors.
07/04/2022 View
Research Report 431 The mechanisms and types of non-motor vehicle injuries to pedestrians in the transport system and indicated infrastructure implications
Waka Kotahi NZ Transport Agency

Research carried out in 2008-2010 examined the quantum and causes of non-motor vehicle injuries to pedestrians through a structured interview survey. Pedestrians sustaining injuries in locations away from the road network (eg in parks) were excluded, as the emphasis was on the role of road and footpath features. The highest proportion of trips and falls (34%) was sustained while stepping over a kerb. A further 18% were caused by irregularities in the path or road surface. Factors that amplified the severity of injuries included the road or path surface, pedestrians' inattention, type of footwear worn, and whether walking or running. Two main issues were identified from the study. These were:

  1. people tripped and fell more often on poorly maintained surfaces as opposed to poorly designed areas
  2. the severity of the injuries is directly related to the surface.

The study recommends improving the definition of kerbing in key pedestrian areas and improving the maintenance regime of footpaths and roads used by pedestrians, eg crossings. The study also found that it is necessary to instigate research to provide improved data and analysis tools to prioritise such countermeasures vis-a-vis other uses of road safety funds and improved data for input into such analysis tools. Further, a national guide is needed for pedestrian road safety audits and inspections covering both motor vehicle and non-motor vehicle risk.

07/04/2022 View
Research report 428 Trialling pedestrian countdown timers at traffic signals
Waka Kotahi NZ Transport Agency

The overall research objective was to evaluate changes in pedestrian safety and traffic efficiency from installing pedestrian countdown timers. The study analysed pedestrian behaviour and safety before and after the installation of a trial countdown timer at the intersection of Queens Street, Bunny Street and Margaret Street in Lower Hutt in July 2007. The results were compared with the 2006/07 trial at the Queen Street/Victoria Street intersection in Auckland CBD and showed very different results. The Auckland city trial indicated that, if placed in suitable locations, pedestrian countdown signals were associated with pedestrian behaviour change that enhanced safety. This study in Lower Hutt demonstrated that the observed pedestrian safety decreased as the percentage of both late starters and late finishers increased, although this was likely to be due to the nature of the intersection with one particularly long diagonal crossing coupled with the allocated phase times. In contrast, perceived pedestrian safety increased with the installation of the countdown timers.

07/04/2022 View
Research Report 359 Valuing the health benefits of active modes
Waka Kotahi NZ Transport Agency

This report seeks to provide a per-kilometre value for the health benefits of active transport modes (such as walking and cycling) that is compatible with the Land Transport New Zealand Economic Evaluation Manual Volume 2 (EEM2). The first two sections of the report begin by explaining the scope of the project and the background. Section 3 investigates the evidence of the connection between physical activity and health outcomes. Section 4 clarifies the role of active transport modes as physical activity, and reports the New Zealand-specific data about active transport mode engagement. Section 5 gives a brief comparative summary of the literature review of cost-benefit analyses and valuation techniques used overseas to value the health benefits of active modes. This report uses population attributable fractions (PAF) to estimate the annual burden of mortality and morbidity costs per inactive adult. Annual estimates of the costs of inactivity are applied to the New Zealand adult population using a weighted sum to establish a per-kilometre value for each mode. The valuation presented in this report is limited by a poverty of data, but the final values are considered to be a reasonable estimate of the health benefits of active modes. While further research is recommended to obtain more precise estimates of the costs of inactivity in New Zealand, it is considered that the values presented in this report are a sound interim estimate for inclusion in the EEM2.

07/04/2022 View
Research Report 329 Impediments to walking as a mode choice
Waka Kotahi NZ Transport Agency

Conducted in 2005, this study evaluates a case-control design of contrasts between walkers and drivers to address factors influencing the uptake of walking as a mode choice. With samples drawn from Auckland and Wellington, New Zealand, this research uses a 62-item survey to examine a number of factors: fear of crime; trip-chaining/car dependency; weather; distance/time; social pressure, fatigue and fitness, parking charges, enjoyment of walking, inconvenience, and geography. To avoid factors such as car dependency or the inability to walk, participants are selected because they live a short distance from public transport parking facilities. The group of drivers demonstrate an irregular break in car dependency by driving their cars to the station in order to use public transport. The results indicate that for parking facilities, convenience creates demand. Poor weather has an influence on the decision to drive, and fine weather improves the likelihood of walking. Previous studies claim decisions to walk are impeded by certain factors. While location effects are observed between the groups, these results suggest that such factors are in fact inconsequential.

07/04/2022 View
Research Report 294 Increasing cycling and walking: an analysis of readiness to change
Waka Kotahi NZ Transport Agency

In 2003, Sport and Recreation New Zealand (SPARC) and the Cancer Society of New Zealand commissioned a major social marketing survey to segment adult New Zealanders in terms of physical activity and healthy eating habits. The questionnaire included several transport-related questions. The resulting ‘Obstacles to Action’ database contains responses from over 8000 people aged 16 or over.

07/04/2022 View
Non-motorised user monitoring technology
ViaStrada
07/04/2022 View
Monitoring Walking and Cycling: Creating Vibrant Towns and Cities
Waka Kotahi NZ Transport Agency
07/04/2022 View
Programme/project logic models
Waka Kotahi NZ Transport Agency

The links provide different guides to developing programme/project logic models.

07/04/2022 View
Healthy Streets
Healthy Streets

Towns and cities everywhere are facing the challenge of keeping communities healthy and happy. Healthy Streets® offers clients around the world an evidence-based approach to creating fairer, sustainable and attractive urban spaces.

07/04/2022 View
Benefits management guidance
Waka Kotahi NZ Transport Agency

This guidance is to help transport planners, business case writers and anyone involved in transport investment understand the Land Transport Benefits Framework and how to use benefits management in their work.

07/04/2022 View
Code of practice for temporary traffic management (CoPTTM: Part 8 of the Traffic Control Devices manual (TCD Manual)
Waka Kotahi NZ Transport Agency

This is the standard reference for all temporary traffic management on state highways and local roads. It includes levels of temporary traffic management, signs and forms used, and a series of sample traffic management plans. 

07/04/2022 View
Land Transport Rule: Traffic Control Devices 2004
Waka Kotahi NZ Transport Agency

This rule covers requirements for the design, construction, installation, operation and maintenance of traffic control devices, and functions and responsibilities of road controlling authorities.

07/04/2022 View
Traffic control devices manual (TCD manual)
Waka Kotahi NZ Transport Agency

The Traffic control devices manual (TCD manual) provides guidance on industry best practice, including, where necessary, practice mandated by law in relation to the use of traffic control devices.

07/04/2022 View
Land Transport (Road User) Rule 2004
Waka Kotahi NZ Transport Agency

This rule establishes the rules under which traffic operates on roads. It applies to all road users, whether they are drivers, riders, passengers, pedestrians, or leading or droving animals.

07/04/2022 View
Tactical Urbanism Handbook
Waka Kotahi NZ Transport Agency

The draft Tactical Urbanism Handbook has been developed as a tool to help councils and communities deliver tactical urbanism projects to a high standard, using a collaborative best-practice approach.

07/04/2022 View
Streets for People
Waka Kotahi NZ Transport Agency

Creating a healthier future by putting people and place at the heart of our streets.

07/04/2022 View
Standard safety intervention toolkit
Waka Kotahi NZ Transport Agency

The Standard Safety Intervention toolkit provides guidance for road safety practitioners on the effectiveness and value-for-money cost range of proven safety interventions to reduce the number of people killed and seriously injured on Aotearoa roads.

07/04/2022 View
Safe walking and cycling treatments for intersections and crossings
Waka Kotahi NZTransport Agency

Waka Kotahi NZTransport Agency and the Transportation Group are hosting a series of free webinars focused on creating vibrant towns and cities. This webinar aims to introduce some of the current state-of-the-art thinking around these safety measures for our active modes. For more information on the ‘Creating vibrant towns and cities’ webinar series, visit www.nzta.govt.nz/creating-vibrant-towns-and-cities

07/04/2022 View
How to Talk About Urban Mobility and Transport Shift: A Short Guide, 2020
The Workshop

This guide is designed for technical experts, communicators and advocates working to deliver urban mobility solutions that grow the share of travel by public transport, walking and cycling. Its purpose is to help us use more effective strategies to: improve people’s understanding, based on best evidence, of why a shift in transport modalities away from cars and towards active and public transport is needed; help people designing and leading the shift to have better conversations with the public; motivate people to act in support of these shifts. This guide is based on a literature review conducted by The Workshop on behalf of Waka Kotahi NZ Transport Agency.

07/04/2022 View
How to Talk about Urban Mobility: Narratives for Deeper Understandings
Waka Kotahi NZ Transport Agency

This webinar provides a theoretically driven, evidence-led framework so we can understand how to:

● improve people’s understanding, based on best evidence, of why a shift in transport modalities away from cars and towards active and public transport is needed

● help people designing and leading the shift to have better conversations with the public

● motivate people to act in support of these shifts.

Part of the Creating vibrant towns and cities webinar series https://www.nzta.govt.nz/walking-cycling-and-public-transport/creating-vibrant-towns-and-cities-webinar-series/

07/04/2022 View
Providing for Walking and Cycling in Transport Projects Policy
Transport for NSW

Transport for NSW allocates physical and temporal road user space safely and equitably to support the movement of people and goods and place objectives

07/04/2022 View
Household Travel Survey (HTS)
Transport for NSW

The most comprehensive source of personal travel data for the Sydney Greater Metropolitan Area (GMA). Find out how and why people travel.

07/04/2022 View
Strategic Parking Management
Waka Kotahi NZ Transport Agency

Part of Urban Mobility & Liveable Cities Series. Presented by Lorelei Schmitt, Principal Multimodal Advisor, Waka Kotahi NZ Transport Agency and George Lyons

07/04/2022 View
System Change and Communications: Shifting the Dial
Waka Kotahi NZ Transport Agency

Part of Urban Mobility and Liveable Cities Series, presented by Kathryn King, Portfolio manager Developing Regions, Waka Kotahi NZ Transport Agency

07/04/2022 View
Healthy Streets
Waka Kotahi NZ Transport Agency

Part of Urban Mobility and Liveable Cities Series. Featuring Claire Pascoe (Waka Kotahi NZ Transport Agency), Hamish Mackie (Mackie Research) and Lemauga Lydia Sosense, Chair Mangere Otahuhu Local Board.

24/11/2021 View
Urban Mobility and Liveable Cities: Shaping Urban Form
Waka Kotahi NZ Transport Agency
19/10/2021 View
Tactile Indicator Installation Note - webinar
Waka Kotahi NZ Transport Agency

This webinar is for anyone involved in the design, installation and construction supervision of tactile ground surface indicators (TGSIs/tactile paving).

19/10/2021 View
Tactile Indicator Installation Note
Waka Kotahi NZ Transport Agency

The purpose of this technical note is to provide some high-level recommended practice to contractors carrying out the installation of tactile pavers as requested in an industry survey in 2018. This is a supplementary publication aimed at roading and utility contractors to provide a simple guide for reinstating tactile pavers affected by their works.

19/10/2021 View
RTS14 Guidelines for facilities for blind and vision impaired pedestrians
Waka Kotahi NZ Transport Agency

RTS 14 is the official guide that ensures that design and operation of roads and paths caters for blind and vision impaired pedestrians. It also takes into account the needs of people with impaired mobility.

It provides detailed requirements for a continuous accessible path, tactile ground surface indicators and audible tactile traffic signal features.

19/10/2021 View
Bridging the Gap: NZTA Urban Design Guidelines
Waka Kotahi NZ Transport Agency

The guidelines seek to improve the understanding of what good urban design means in a transport project. The guidelines are intended for consultants, contractors, project managers, stakeholders and the community who participate in the planning, design, construction and maintenance of our transport networks. They are also intended for other Transport Agency staff whose work and actions affect urban design outcomes.

19/10/2021 View
Pedestrian Planning and Design Guide
Waka Kotahi NZ Transport Agency

The Pedestrian planning and design guide is New Zealand's comprehensive official guide to planning and design for walking. It sets out ways to improve New Zealand’s walking environment

19/10/2021 View
Low-powered Vehicles
Waka Kotahi NZ Transport Agency

There is a range of low-powered devices that New Zealanders use for travel or recreation. While these vehicles and devices offer the benefit of increased mobility, they can also increase your safety risks on and around the road.

19/10/2021 View
NZ Road Code Information for Pedestrians
Waka Kotahi NZ Transport Agency

As a pedestrian, it’s important that you follow the road rules and guidelines. They will help ensure your safety when you’re walking near roads or crossing the road.

19/10/2021 View
NZ Road Code for Cyclists
Waka Kotahi NZ Transport Agency
19/10/2021 View
Trials Underway and Rules Changes
Waka Kotahi NZ Transport Agency

Keeps the industry up to date with cycle design trials that are currently underway, or have been completed in recent years, and also what cycling-related rules are being reviewed and when

19/10/2021 View
Designing a Cycling Facility
Waka Kotahi NZ Transport Agency

Provides users with best practice guidance, either directly or through links to appropriate sources for all stages of design, from concept stage through to detailed design

19/10/2021 View
Planning a Cycling Network
Waka Kotahi NZ Transport Agency

Provides users with best practice guidance, either directly or through links to appropriate sources for all stages of planning a cycle network

19/10/2021 View
Technical note #4: Buffered Cycle Lane Design
Waka Kotahi NZ Transport Agency

Guidance on the design of buffered cycle lanes for varying carriageway widths

19/10/2021 View
Technical note #3: Cycle Count Scaling Spreadsheet
Waka Kotahi NZ Transport Agency

Describes scaling methodology and use of the Cycle count scaling spreadsheet tool, used to scale permanent and short-term count data for average daily cyclist values

19/10/2021 View
Technical note #2: Separated Cycleways at Side Roads and Driveways
Waka Kotahi NZ Transport Agency

This updated guidance covers how to design a priority-controlled cycle crossing of a side road or driveway

19/10/2021 View
Technical note #1: Separated Cycleway Options Tool
Waka Kotahi NZ Transport Agency

Guidance on use of the Separated cycleway options tool (SCOT), used to assist in the decision on whether to provide two 1-way facilities or a single 2-way facility on a particular route

19/10/2021 View
Buffered Advance Stop Box
Waka Kotahi NZ Transport Agency

Provides a treatment solution for advance stop boxes to improve visibility of cyclists from heavy vehicles and decrease the level of vehicle encroachment

19/10/2021 View
Access Control Devices
Waka Kotahi NZ Transport Agency

Guidance on the design, installation and management of access control devices on facilities where cyclists are permitted to be present.

18/10/2021 View
Considering Historic Heritage in Walking and Cycling Projects
Waka Kotahi NZ Transport Agency

The draft Handbook for tactical urbanism has been developed as a tool to help councils and communities deliver tactical urbanism projects to a high standard, using a collaborative best-practice approach.

07/10/2021 View
Draft Handbook for Tactical Urbanism in Aotearoa
Waka Kotahi NZ Transport Agency

The draft Handbook for tactical urbanism has been developed as a tool to help councils and communities deliver tactical urbanism projects to a high standard, using a collaborative best-practice approach.

06/10/2021 View
Shared and Separated Path Guidelines
Department of Transport WA

This document provides practitioners with guidance surrounding the planning and design of shared and separated paths in Western Australia to enable the safe and efficient movement of bicycle riders of all ages and abilities. It is intended to be a convenient and practical reference guide aimed at practitioners with varying levels of experience.

06/10/2021 View
Draft Handbook for tactical urbanism in Aotearoa - Guidance: roadway art
Waka Kotahi NZ Transport Agency

A supplement to the Handbook for tactical urbanism provides draft guidance on compliant application of using road artwork effectively and safely in New Zealand.

30/09/2021 View
High-use driveway treatment for cycle paths and shared paths
Waka Kotahi NZ Transport Agency

Provides a treatment solution for commercial and high-use access points on cycleways and shared paths.

30/09/2021 View
Cycle Parking Planning and Design
Waka Kotahi NZ Transport Agency

This guidance summarises best practice provision of parking and end-of-trip facilities for people who cycle.

30/09/2021 View
Signs and markings to designate paths for pedestrians and cyclists
Waka Kotahi NZ Transport Agency

Guidance on where and how to use markings and/or signs that designate paths for pedestrians and/or cyclists.

30/09/2021 View
Sharrow Markings
Waka Kotahi NZ Transport Agency

Guidance on the implementation of shared lane markings (‘sharrows’).

30/09/2021 View
Cycle Facility Cost Estimation Tool
Waka Kotahi NZ Transport Agency

Tool to calculate and compare the rough order cost of a range of cycle route, facility and signalised intersection options.

24/09/2021 View
Cycleway Separation Device Selection Matrix
Waka Kotahi NZ Transport Agency

Matrix comparing types of cycleway separation device, and issues to be considered.

24/09/2021 View
Cycle Count Scaling Spreadsheet Tool
Waka Kotahi NZ Transport Agency

Allows permanent and short-term count data to be scaled to average daily cyclist values.

24/09/2021 View
Separated Cycleway Options Tool
Waka Kotahi NZ Transport Agency

Tool to assist in the decision on whether to provide two 1-way facilities or a single 2-way facility on a particular route.

21/09/2021 View
Design Guidance for Pedestrian and Cycle Rail Crossings
Waka Kotahi NZ Transport Agency

Waka Kotahi NZ Transport Agency and KiwiRail have been leading the development of a design guide for pedestrian and cycleway treatment at level crossings. The guide will improve safety, usability, compliance, consistency and will simplify the design process.

21/09/2021 View
Cycling Network Guidance
Waka Kotahi NZ Transport Agency

Cycling network guidance – planning and design (CNG) framework aims to promote a consistent, best-practice approach to cycling network and route planning throughout New Zealand.

06/09/2021 View
Research Report 660: Factors affecting cycling levels of service
Waka Kotahi NZ Transport Agency

This report examines cyclists’ perceptions of cycle infrastructure levels of service and proposes an assessment methodology for evaluating the level of service provided by cycling facilities.

03/09/2021 View
National Walking and Cycling Participation Survey 2021 - NSW
Cycling and Walking Australia and New Zealand

The National Walking and Cycling Participation Survey provides insight into walking and cycling activity across Australia and is a successor to the National Cycling Participation Survey which was conducted biennially from 2011 to 2019.

02/09/2021 View
National Walking and Cycling Participation Survey 2021 - Final Report
Cycling & Walking Australia and New Zealand

The National Walking and Cycling Participation Survey (NWCPS) provides insight into walking and cycling activity across Australia and is a successor to the National Cycling Participation Survey which was conducted biennially from 2011 to 2019.

02/09/2021 View
National Walking and Cycling Participation Survey 2021 - WA
Cycling and Walking Australia and New Zealand

The National Walking and Cycling Participation Survey (NWCPS) provides insight into walking and cycling activity across Australia and is a successor to the National Cycling Participation Survey which was conducted biennially from 2011 to 2019.

31/08/2021 View
National Walking and Cycling Participation Survey 2021 - Victoria
Cycling and Walking Australia and New Zealand

The National Walking and Cycling Participation Survey (NWCPS) provides insight into walking and cycling activity across Australia and is a successor to the National Cycling Participation Survey which was conducted biennially from 2011 to 2019.

31/08/2021 View
National Walking and Cycling Participation Survey 2021 - Tasmania
Cycling and Walking Australia and New Zealand

The National Walking and Cycling Participation Survey (NWCPS) provides insight into walking and cycling activity across Australia and is a successor to the National Cycling Participation Survey which was conducted biennially from 2011 to 2019.

31/08/2021 View
National Walking and Cycling Participation Survey 2021 - SA
Cycling and Walking Australia and New Zealand

The National Walking and Cycling Participation Survey (NWCPS) provides insight into walking and cycling activity across Australia and is a successor to the National Cycling Participation Survey which was conducted biennially from 2011 to 2019.

31/08/2021 View
National Walking and Cycling Participation Survey 2021 - Queensland
Cycling and Walking Australia and New Zealand

The National Walking and Cycling Participation Survey (NWCPS) provides insight into walking and cycling activity across Australia and is a successor to the National Cycling Participation Survey which was conducted biennially from 2011 to 2019.

31/08/2021 View
National Walking and Cycling Participation Survey 2021 - ACT
Cycling and Walking Australia and New Zealand

The National Walking and Cycling Participation Survey (NWCPS) provides insight into walking and cycling activity across Australia and is a successor to the National Cycling Participation Survey which was conducted biennially from 2011 to 2019.

31/08/2021 View
National Walking and Cycling Participation Survey 2021 - NT
Cycling and Walking Australia and New Zealand

The National Walking and Cycling Participation Survey (NWCPS) provides insight into walking and cycling activity across Australia and is a successor to the National Cycling Participation Survey which was conducted biennially from 2011 to 2019.

31/08/2021 View
Urban Cycleways Programme: National monitoring and data reporting requirements
Waka Kotahi NZ Transport Agency

Outlines the national monitoring and reporting requirements for the Urban Cycleways Programme (UCP) projects. Includes best practice methodologies for measuring the success of new cycle infrastructure as well as wider network monitoring.

18/08/2021 View
Monitoring and Reporting
Waka Kotahi NZ Transport Agency

A description of the monitoring required, particularly once the implementation of the cycle network plan has started.

18/08/2021 View
Cycling Photo Library
Waka Kotahi NZ Transport Agency

Browse our collection of vibrant photos showcasing kiwi landmarks and everyday New Zealanders cycling in a variety of settings.
Taken across five different urban areas – Auckland, Wellington, Palmerston North, Nelson and Christchurch – the images reflect the diversity of people who cycle and the changing landscape for cycling in New Zealand.

18/08/2021 View
Cycling Standards and Guidance
Waka Kotahi NZ Transport Agency

Cycling network guidance – planning and design (CNG) framework aims to promote a consistent, best-practice approach to cycling network and route planning throughout New Zealand.

18/08/2021 View
Workplace Cycling Guide
Waka Kotahi NZ Transport Agency

This online guide provides all the key information to help your workplace better provide for people on bikes.

18/08/2021 View
Journey Planner
Waka Kotahi NZ Transport Agency
13/08/2021 View
Employer e-bike Purchase Support Schemes
Waka Kotahi NZ Transport Agency

Employer e-bike purchase support schemes are helping many more people to purchase e-bikes by addressing the key barrier of the upfront cost. They work through employers negotiating a discount from an e-bike supplier and then providing a wage advance or loan to staff, paid back through salary deductions over a set period.

13/08/2021 View
Research Report 621: Regulations and Safety for Electric Bicycles and Other Low-powered Vehicles
Waka Kotahi NZ Transport Agency

This research report presents a review of overseas legislation, technology trends, market and safety analyses for low-powered, low-speed vehicles.
These vehicles include electric bicycles, mobility scooters, self-balancing devices and other personal mobility or wheeled recreational devices.
Current New Zealand LPV legislation is based only on motor power and how certain LPVs may be used. In all other countries reviewed, top motor-assisted speed is regulated.
The report assesses various regulatory and non-regulatory options for improving safety while supporting technological innovation and mode choice options in New Zealand.

13/08/2021 View
Cycling Skills and Training
Waka Kotahi NZ Transport Agency

A national cycling education system called BikeReady to increase the reach of cycling education in New Zealand. The system will improve quality and consistencies based on best practice, and, provide a monitoring and evaluation framework so we can assess how effective the system is at improving safety and encouraging more people to ride.

12/08/2021 View
Cycle Safety
Waka Kotahi NZ Transport Agency

A few simple tips to stay safe when sharing the road.

12/08/2021 View
New Zealand Road Code for Cyclists
Waka Kotahi NZ Transport Agency

The official New Zealand code for cyclists is a user-friendly guide to New Zealand’s traffic law and safe cycling practices.

12/08/2021 View
Keeping Cities Moving
Waka Kotahi NZ Transport Agency

Waka Kotahi NZ Transport Agency has developed a plan to deliver on social, environmental and economic outcomes by growing the share of travel by public transport, walking and cycling (also known as mode shift).
For urban areas to thrive people need to be able to move around easily and have a range of choices about how they get to work, connect with family and friends and access services. We need to build a modern transport system with a mix of reliable transport options that help keep people and products safely moving.
The Waka Kotahi plan – Keeping cities moving – looks to do this through three main ways: shaping urban form, making shared and active modes more attractive, and influencing travel demand and transport choices.
The plan outlines 35 interventions that seek to increase the pace of change in cities and ensure that investment is targeted to help provide more transport choice and ultimately reduce car dependency.

04/08/2021 View
Sydney City Centre Access Strategy
Transport for NSW

The Sydney City Centre Access Strategy gets our city centre moving, addresses growth and will lead to increased investment for our future.
It is a plan of action to put the right mode in the right place in the city centre, cut congestion and support a globally competitive Sydney.

03/08/2021 View
NSW Regional Transport Plans
Transport for NSW

Major gains on key transport infrastructure and services for the region’s growing communities.

Regions:
Central Coast, Central West, Hunter, Illawarra, Mid North Coast, Murray-Murrumbidgee, New England North West, Northern Rivers, Southern, Western

03/08/2021 View
NSW Long Term Transport Master Plan
Transport for NSW

The NSW Long Term Transport Master Plan sets the framework for the NSW Government to deliver an integrated, modern transport system that puts the customer first. The Master Plan plays two fundamental roles. First, it identifies the challenges that the transport system in NSW needs to address to support the State’s economic and social performance over the next 20 years. It guides decision-makers to prioritise actions that address the most pressing challenges.
Second, it identifies a planned and coordinated set of actions (reforms, service improvements and investments) to address those challenges. It provides a map of future service and infrastructure developments which future decisions will be required to support, and against which proposed investments can be evaluated.

03/08/2021 View
Walking and Cycling Program Guidelines
Transport for NSW

These guidelines outline the priority weighting system that will be used to assess walking and cycling proposals submitted to the NSW Government for funding.

03/08/2021 View
Sydney's Walking Future
Transport for NSW

The NSW Government’s goal is to get people in Sydney walking more through actions that make it a more convenient, better connected and safer mode of transport. The more people walk, the more socially engaged the community becomes and the safer people feel when walking for transport.
The actions set out in Sydney’s Walking Future will make walking the transport choice for quick trips under two kilometres and will help people access public transport. Increasing the number of people walking will help to reduce the burden of congestion on our roads and free up capacity on key public transport corridors.

03/08/2021 View
Household Travel Survey Report: Sydney 2012/13
Transport for NSW

Understand the travel behaviour and trends of the residents of Sydney Greater Metropolitan Area during 2012/2013, together with trends over the previous decade.

03/08/2021 View
Sydney Cycling Survey 2011
Transport for NSW

The NSW 2021 strategic business plan establishes a target to more than double the mode share of cycling among trips up to 10 km in the Sydney Greater Metropolitan Area by 2016. In order to achieve this target, Roads and Maritime Services (RMS) and the Bureau of Transport Statistics (BTS) commissioned Sinclair Knight Merz to develop a survey method to monitor performance towards this target. This survey was first undertaken in November 2010 and as referred to as the Sydney Cycling Survey (SCS) 2010.

03/08/2021 View
Future Transport
Transport for NSW

Future Transport sets the direction for connecting people, communities and businesses in NSW to provide a successful and thriving future.

03/08/2021 View
NSW Road Safety Strategy 2012-21
Transport for NSW

The NSW Government is committed to improving road safety for the community and plans to make NSW roads the safest in the country. In 2011, we worked with the NSW Road Safety Advisory Council and the heavy vehicle industry to develop the NSW Road Safety Strategy 2012-2021.
The strategy established the directions for road safety in NSW for the 10 years 2012-2021 and outlines 'Working Towards Vision Zero' as a key part of the strategy, which aims to reduce the likelihood of crashes and the severity of those that occur. The strategy also sets a target to reduce annual deaths and serious injuries by at least 30 per cent by 2021.

02/08/2021 View
Cycle Route Directional Signage Example
Department of Infrastructure, Energy and Resources

An example of the process that can be used to map and plan the direction signs required to navigate along a cycle route. The example used is the Battery Point section of the Sandy Bay to Hobart and return route.

30/07/2021 View
Cycle Route Directional Signage Resource Manual
Department of Infrastructure, Energy and Resources

As part of the implementation of the Walking and Cycling for Active Transport Strategy 2010, this document aims to provide a resource for cycle infrastructure owners to utilise when developing and implementing directional signage for cycle routes.

30/07/2021 View
Move more, sit less
Tasmanian Government

The Move more, sit less campaign aims to raise awareness of the benefits of regular physical activity and minimising sedentary behaviour.

30/07/2021 View
Tasmanian Walking and Cycling for Active Transport Strategy
Department of State Growth

The Tasmanian Walking and Cycling for Active Transport Strategy is a key component of the Tasmanian Urban Passenger Transport Framework, which aims to promote walking and cycling as viable and desirable forms of transport through improved infrastructure, land use planning and behavioural change. The Strategy is intended to guide development of walking and cycling as transport options in our urban areas over the long-term by creating a more supportive transport system for pedestrians and cyclists.

30/07/2021 View
Towards Zero Tasmanian Road Safety Strategy 2017-2026
Department of State Growth

In December 2016, the Government released the Towards Zero—Tasmanian Road Safety Strategy 2017-2026 (Towards Zero Strategy), Tasmania’s ten-year plan to reduce serious injuries and fatalities on our roads.
The Towards Zero Strategy identifies 13 key directions that guide the Government’s road safety efforts. The key directions are based on the best-practice Safe System approach to road safety and were informed by extensive community engagement, stakeholder consultations, and independent research and modelling.

23/07/2021 View
Guide to Sharing Roads and Paths
Transport Canberra and City Services

The Australian Road Rules apply to road users in the ACT, including cyclists. The ACT's Road Transport (Safety and Traffic Management) Regulation 2000 provides some deviation from these, specific for cyclists in the ACT.

22/07/2021 View
Bike Barometer and Active Travel Data
Transport Canberra and City Services

A bike barometer has been located at the intersection of the Sullivan’s Creek shared path and MacArthur Avenue in O’Connor since November 2017. It counts the number of cyclists using a ground sensor.

22/07/2021 View
Active Commuting
Transport Canberra and City Services

Re-think your work journey to save time and money. Active travel is a great way to incorporate regular physical exercise into your daily routine.

22/07/2021 View
Active Travel Programs
Transport Canberra and City Services

School environments are busy during the morning and afternoon peak periods. The best way to reduce congestion and increase safety in these environments is to encourage more children to use active travel, which includes walking, riding or public transport.

21/07/2021 View
Towards Zero Growth: Healthy Weight Action Plan
ACT Government Department of Health

The action plan establishes local action to build on the work of the National Partnership Agreement on Preventive Health, the work of clinicians and nongovernment bodies, and on the many ACT programs already in place under our Healthy Weight Initiative. It will take the healthy weight agenda beyond the Health portfolio and improve coordination across government.

21/07/2021 View
City Plan
ACT Government

This City Plan sets a vision for future development in the city centre and was officially launched in March 2014.

20/07/2021 View
ACT Planning Strategy and Action Plan 2 (ACT Climate Change Strategy)
Environment, Planning and Sustainable Development Directorate - Environment

The ACT Climate Change Strategy 2019–2025 outlines the next steps the community, business and Government will take to reduce emissions by 50–60% (below 1990 levels) by 2025 and establish a pathway for achieving net zero emissions by 2045.

20/07/2021 View
Transport for Canberra
Transport Canberra and City Services

The strategy for transport planning in the ACT to 2031

19/07/2021 View
Building an Integrated Transport Network - Active Travel
Transport Canberra and City Services

The ACT Government's Building an Integrated Transport Network (the Active Travel Framework) recognises that walking and cycling are essential parts of Canberra's transport system. Through active travel initiatives, we're integrating walking and cycling into Canberra's overall urban planning, transport, health, environment and education systems.

19/07/2021 View
New Paths on New Projects
Department of Transport, Victoria

Every major new transport project – from North East Link to the West Gate Tunnel – now includes new or upgraded infrastructure for cyclists and pedestrians.

16/07/2021 View
Active Transport Victoria
Department of Transport, Victoria

The Victorian Government has committed $15.3 million in the Victorian Budget 2019/20 towards Active Transport Victoria projects to deliver key upgrades for safer walking and cycling.

16/07/2021 View
St Kilda Road Bike Lanes
Department of Transport, Victoria

St Kilda Road will soon be safer for everyone with new bike lanes to be built to separate drivers and cyclists.
A Victorian Budget 2019/20 investment of $27.3 million will fund a new layout for one of Victoria’s busiest corridors, combining both central safety zone bike lanes and protected kerbside bike lanes.

16/07/2021 View
Safer CBD Cycling Connections
Department of Transport, Victoria

100kms of new and improved cycling routes across key inner-city suburbs to make it easier and safer for people to cycle to and from the CBD.
This $13 million investment will deliver pop-up lanes to help relieve congestion and provide an alternative to public transport for those living closer to the city.

16/07/2021 View
Strategic Cycling Corridors
Department of Transport, Victoria

Strategic Cycling Corridors are important transport routes for cycling and are a subset of the Principal Bicycle Network.

16/07/2021 View
Victorian Road Safety Strategy 2021-2030
Department of Transport, Victoria

The Victorian Road Safety Strategy 2021-2030 aims to halve deaths by 2030 and put us on a strong path to eliminate all road deaths by 2050.

15/07/2021 View
Sydney CBD to Parramatta Strategic Transport Plan
Transport for NSW

The Sydney CBD to Parramatta Strategic Transport Plan is a transport plan to improve the way people move along and around one of Sydney’s most important and busiest areas, the corridor between Sydney CBD and Parramatta.

15/07/2021 View
Transport for NSW Economic Parameter Values
Transport for NSW

This document recommends economic parameter values for common benefits and costs in transport economic appraisals. By providing best-practice approaches and economic parameter values, this document supports the consistent application of cost-benefit analysis (CBA) across the NSW Transport cluster.

15/07/2021 View
Economic Parameter Values
Transport for NSW

This spreadheet provides all tables in the Transport for NSW Economic Parameter Values.

15/07/2021 View
Way2Go Bike Education
Department for Infrastructure and Transport, South Australia

Bike education

15/07/2021 View
Greenways and Bike Boulevards
Department for Infrastructure and Transport, South Australia

Greenways are dedicated walking and cycling routes following public transport corridors or linear open space, such as along rivers.
Greenways routes typically connect quiet local streets with new off-street paths and arterial road crossings, creating direct cycling routes and better access to public transport stops and stations. Connections to open space, schools and commercial areas are also improved.

15/07/2021 View
Cycling and Walking Maps
Department for Infrastructure and Transport, South Australia

Hard copy Cycling and Walking Maps will assist you to make active travel choices in Adelaide’s metropolitan suburbs. You can use the maps to plan safe walking or cycling routes to local shops, parks and services.

15/07/2021 View
Cycling and Public Transport
Adelaide Metro

Information on bikes and the public transport network.

14/07/2021 View
Cyclist Road Rules and Safety
Department for Infrastructure and Transport, South Australia

While cyclists have the same rights and responsibilities as other road users, they are more vulnerable when travelling on the road. Both cyclists and motorists need to consider each other and share the road safely.

14/07/2021 View
Cycling Grants
Department for Infrastructure and Transport, South Australia

South Australian local government councils can apply for the State Bicycle Fund. Applications are invited to be submitted early in the year for the following financial year's program.

14/07/2021 View
Cycle Instead
Department for Infrastructure and Transport, South Australia

Cycle Instead works as an interactive Journey Planner for your bike trip. It shows you the Bikedirect network across metropolitan Adelaide so you can quickly choose the most direct and comfortable route for your journey using secondary roads, bike lanes, shared paths, greenways and bicycle boulevards.

13/07/2021 View
Cycling Statistics
Department of Infrastructure, Planning and Logistics, NT

Cycling statistics in Darwin, Alice Springs and Super Tuesday bike commuter count for the Northern Territory.

13/07/2021 View
10 Year Infrastructure Plan 2019
Department of Infrastructure, Planning and Logistics, NT

The reviewed Plan aims to help industry with its own planning and workforce management, and inform decision-making across all levels of government. Over the longer term, the Infrastructure Plan sets direction for planning and delivering infrastructure in the Northern Territory.

13/07/2021 View
Towards Zero Action Plan 2018-22
Department of Infrastructure, Planning and Logistics, NT

This five-year road safety action plan focuses on key priority areas to reduce the rate of fatality and serious injury on Territory roads.

12/07/2021 View
Cycling Safety
Department of Transport and Main Roads, Queensland

The rules for bicycle riders to keep everyone safe.

09/07/2021 View
Bike User Guide
Department of Transport and Main Roads, Queensland

Riding a bike is part of Queensland life. With a few tips and a bit of advice, it’s easy to get rolling.

09/07/2021 View
Economic Assessment of Cycling
Department of Transport and Main Roads, Queensland

Infographic showing the growth in cycling in conjunction with the investment in cycling infrastructure within inner Brisbane.
Maps are based on data collected as part of the 5 yearly census by the Australian Bureau of Statistics. The data is drawn from the questions relating to place of employment, and the method of transport used to get to work.

09/07/2021 View
Benefits of Riding
Department of Transport and Main Roads, Queensland

Riding to work, school, uni or college, or taking your bike on short neighbourhood trips is a convenient and practical way to incorporate regular exercise into your busy day.

09/07/2021 View
Cycling Infrastructure Grants
Department of Transport and Main Roads, Queensland

The Queensland Government is committed to achieving the Queensland Cycle Strategy 2017-2027 vision of ‘more cycling, more often on safe, direct and connected routes. The Department of Transport and Main Roads works with local governments to achieve this vision by delivering and improving principal cycle networks across Queensland.

08/07/2021 View
Bike Riding Encouragement Program Community Grants Program 2020-21
Department of Transport and Main Roads, Queensland

The Bicycle Riding Encouragement Program (BREP) community grants provide financial support for activities that help to increase the number of people who regularly ride a bike.

08/07/2021 View
Principal Cycle Network Plans
Department of Transport and Main Roads, Queensland

Principal Cycle Network Plans show core routes needed to get more people cycling more often. Routes shown are indicative and exist to guide further planning. The plans are intended to support, guide and inform the planning, design and construction of the transport network.

Read the Queensland Principal Cycle Network Update - Results of 2022 Community Consultation report to learn more about the consultation process and feedback received. 

08/07/2021 View
Cycling Infrastructure Policy (Queensland)
Department of Transport and Main Roads, Queensland

The Cycling Infrastructure Policy is an important mechanism to deliver the Queensland Government’s vision for more cycling, more often and Transport and Main Roads’ vision of a single integrated transport system accessible to everyone.

07/07/2021 View
Reporting a hazard or crash
Department of Transport, WA

Timely reporting of hazards from the community is vital to maintaining our cycling infrastructure. Find out what hazards to report and how to do so.

07/07/2021 View
Bicycle rules, standards and safety (Western Australia)
Department of Transport, WA

Before starting to ride, bicycle riders should be familiar with bicycle standards and equipment, legislation for use of shared paths, roads, intersections and footpaths.

07/07/2021 View
Your Move
Department of Transport, WA

Your Move is an active lifestyle program that helps people find simple ways to get active and connected. Your Move offers information and support to make it easier to get active.

07/07/2021 View
WA Bicycle Network Plan
Department of Transport, WA

The WABN Plan aims to make WA a place where cycling is safe, connected, and convenient and a widely accepted form of transport.

06/07/2021 View
Safe Active Streets Program
Department of Transport, WA

An innovative program designed to make streets, friendlier and safer for all users including people in cars and those riding bikes and walking.

06/07/2021 View
Towards Zero Action Plan 2018-22

Towards Zero Road Safety Action Plan (Towards Zero) is a five year road safety action plan focuses on road safety actions to address the key priority areas for the Northern Territory. The Towards Zero Action Plan will work towards improving road safety in the Northern Territory. It will guide improvements in road safety, making all road users safer and reducing the rate of fatality and serious injury on Territory roads.

20/05/2021 View
National Cycling Participation Survey (NCPS)
Austroads

The National Cycling Participation Survey (NCPS) is a standardised survey that has been repeated biennially since March/April 2011, with minor changes to the survey structure between 2011 and 2013. The NCPS provides data on cycling participation at a national level and allows for estimates of participation for each state and territory, and the capital cities and non-capital areas within each state and territory.

20/05/2021 View
Australasian Pedestrian Crossing Facility Selection Tool
Austroads

The Pedestrian Facility Selection Tool is designed to help Australian and New Zealand practitioners select the most appropriate type of pedestrian crossing based on walkability, safety and economic outcomes.

20/05/2021 View
Victorian Cycling Strategy 2019-2028
Department of Transport, Victoria

The Victorian Cycling Strategy 2018-2028 is guiding planning and investment to get more people to cycle for transport – to work, school, public transport and shops – in Melbourne and the regions.

20/05/2021 View
WA Bicycle Network Grants Program
Department of Transport, WA

The Western Australian Bicycle Network (WABN) Grants Program is an initiative of the Western Australian State Government, administered by the Department of Transport.

20/05/2021 View
Regional 2050 Cycling Strategies
Department of Transport, WA

The Department of Transport’s Regional 2050 Cycling Strategies aim to realise the cycling potential of regional Western Australia.

18/05/2021 View
Queensland Walking Strategy
Department of Transport and Main Roads, Queensland

Queensland’s first walking strategy recognises the critical role that walking plays as part of a single integrated transport system accessible to everyone and as part of a healthy, active lifestyle for all Queenslanders.

Includes Queensland Walking Strategy 2019-2029, Action Plan for Walking, Walking in Queensland Report.

18/05/2021 View
Queensland Cycling Strategy 2017-2027
Department of Transport and Main Roads, Queensland

The Queensland Cycling Strategy 2017-2027 sets the strategic direction for cycling in Queensland over the next 10 years. The strategy identifies 5 priorities to achieve the Queensland Government's vision for 'more cycling, more often':

  • building and connecting infrastructure to grow participation.
  • encouraging more people to ride.
  • sharing our roads and public spaces.
  • powering the economy.
  • using research and data in decision making. 

The strategy includes a 2-year action plan and report on the state of cycling in Queensland.

18/05/2021 View
Cycleway Design Toolbox
Transport for NSW

Need description

17/05/2021 View
Walking Space Guide
Transport for NSW

The Walking Space Guide (Guide) provides a set of standards and tools to assist those responsible for Walking Spaces on streets, to ensure that sufficient space is provided to achieve comfortable environments which encourage people to walk.

The Guide offers a clear, consistent set of standards and processes to be applied in designing, planning and implementing the amount of space to be provided according to the intensity of use. It is intended that designs are appropriate to the number of people using footpaths.

This guide contains the method for carrying out a Walking Space assessment and offers guidance on how to understand the results. The guide includes an accompanying spreadsheet for recording data and calculating results.

17/05/2021 View